M Centofanti Photography: Blog https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog en-us (C) M Centofanti Photography info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) Tue, 03 May 2022 04:05:00 GMT Tue, 03 May 2022 04:05:00 GMT https://www.mcentofanti.photography/img/s/v-12/u462956527-o231281933-50.jpg M Centofanti Photography: Blog https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog 66 120 How Many Camera Bags Does a Photographer Need https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2022/4/how-many-camera-bags-have-you-bought How Many BagsHow Many Bags

Every photographer needs a camera bag. Preferably one that not only protects the equipment, but is also comfortable to use. It has to carry at least a camera and a couple of lenses, along with the necessary accessories. Unfortunately, there is not one camera bag that is perfect for every situation.

Camera bags come in all shapes and sizes. But what I discovered over the years is, that a perfect bag for every situation doesn’t exist. What’s perfect depends not only on the situation you’re in, but also on personal preferences. 

First of all, don’t go cheap on a camera bag. Remember, it will carry the expensive equipment you own. It has to protect your camera and lenses while transporting during travels. The material has to be strong enough and durable. It doesn’t mean a cheap bag is a bad bag. Just be careful when choosing one and don’t get fooled when a perfect bag for everything is presented; It doesn’t exist.

The Backpack

A camera backpack is perhaps the most used camera bag that exists, and for good reasons. In general, a backpack can carry a lot of weight without too much physical strain. A good backpack will let you wear the most weight on the waist. That’s why a good waist belt on a backpack is essential.

The remaining weight is carried on the shoulder, distributing the weight evenly. A good padded shoulder band is important, just like a sternum strap. This way it is relatively easy to carry up to 15 kilograms without a lot of problems. It means you can carry a lot of photography equipment for an extended amount of time.

This is why nearly every photographer I have met uses a camera backpack. But there is one big downside to a backpack: You need to remove it from your back to take the camera out, or when you need to change lenses. It has to be placed on the ground to reach for the equipment. This takes time and most of all, you need to have a safe location for the backpack to place on.

A backpack is perfect for taking equipment with you on a long hike. But it may not be the best choice in every situation. If you’re photographing on the beach, it's not wise to place the backpack near the shoreline. When standing on muddy grounds, your bag will get wet and dirty. When photographing in crowded locations you have to keep an eye for the criminal that is looking for an opportunity.

The Shoulder Bag

There are a lot of occasions where a shoulder bag can be a better choice. This kind of bag doesn’t have to be placed on the ground when you have to access the bag. Just open it while it’s on your shoulder and grab the camera or lens you need.

I found a shoulder bag very convenient on a beach, or whilst standing in mountain streams. And you can keep your bag close to your body in crowded locations. But there are downsides to a shoulder bag and perhaps the most important one is the strain it can have on your body. The weight of the bag and equipment is on one shoulder only.

On the other hand, a shoulder bag isn’t meant for the transport of large amounts of equipment or for hiking. But if you're on location, the weight isn't an issue. Most of the time you have the camera in your hands and the bag will only contain one or two lenses. This way the shoulder bag is more convenient compared to a backpack.

Something In-Between Backpack and Shoulder Bag

There are backpacks that allow easy access without the need of placing them on the ground. With some backpacks, you can remove your arms from the shoulder straps first, and then the backpack can be rotated in front of you. The back panel will allow access to your equipment.

Although this system obviously will work, it is often not a very convenient way of accessing the equipment. Rotating the backpack with the waist belt in place isn’t that easy, especially when wearing a winter jacket. Also, the weight of the equipment will place a lot of strain on the waist belt, and your waist also. Although I have tried, I rather place the backpack on the ground.

Another solution is presented with a sling bag. Just sling the bag in front of you and grab the camera or lens you need. It works better compared to the rotating backpack I mentioned. But to be honest, it's nothing more than an ordinary shoulder bag. When placed on your back, it’s still hanging over one shoulder.

I have also tried a modular system. A few lens pouches on a belt is a nice idea and it works quite well. You don’t have a bag over your shoulder, while you have easy access to the lenses you carry with you. Still, more than two lenses on your waist can get heavy over time because the complete weight is only placed on your waist. If you combine it with a backpack, the modular system works great. On location, grab the lenses you need from the backpack and store them in the lens pouches.

Every Photographer Should Have More Than One Bag

Over the years I owned a lot of camera bags. At present time I use a large backpack and a smaller shoulder bag. You need to choose the bag that is perfect for the job. If you don’t have to hike and not change lenses a lot, use a shoulder bag. In that case take one, or perhaps two additional lenses with you. If you go on a hike you need a backpack or If you carry a lot of equipment take the larger backpack. If you just need a camera and one or two lenses, or a single flash, grab a smaller backpack. 

So, how many camera bags does a photographer need? I think most photographers need at least two bags. One backpack and one shoulder bag. Do you agree?

What kind of camera bag do you have? Which one do you prefer and why? Please let me know in the comments below. I am looking forward to your response.

PS: With everything going on in the country or world we need to make the attempt to buy Made in the USA products and stop buying from China. But unfortunately with camera bags or backpacks they may be challenging. Below is a list to the  best of my ability as to where bags are made:

Made in the USA:

Copper River Bag Company in Nevada City, California

Hold Fast Inc, in Tulsa, Oklahoma

Pelican in Torrence, California & Plymouth Minnesota & South Deerfield, Massachusetts 

Porta Brace in Bennington, Vermont

The Tiffen Company (Domke Bags) - in Hauppauge, New York

Tuff Traveler Ltd in Schenectady, New York

 

Other than USA but not China:

Australia: Pelican

Dominican Republic: ONA

Germany: Compagnon, Evoc, Pelican

Italy: Manfrotto, Porta Brace

Mexico: Newswear

Sweeden: Case Logic, Thule

Taiwan: Wontan Craft

UK: Billingham

Vietnam: Peak Design, Think Tank, Vandra Prvk

 

STAY AWAY FROM CHINA:

  • Artisan

  • Crumpler

  • Endurax (Cheap stuff from Amazon)

  • F 64 ( last known)

  • F Stop

  • Jill-E Designa

  • Kata

  • Lightware

  • Lowepro

  • Mountainsmith

  • National Geographic

  • Pacsafe

  • Petrol

  • Shimoda

  • Tamrac

  • Tenba

  • Think Tank - Mindshift

  • Vanguard (Myanmar)

This post is published by - Michael Centofanti 
 

 

 

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) B&H Photo Camera bags Canon Copper River Domke Hold Fast Inc Lowepro Manfrotto Nikon Peak Design Rockbrook Camera Sony Tamrac Tempe Camera Think Tank https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2022/4/how-many-camera-bags-have-you-bought Sat, 16 Apr 2022 22:10:51 GMT
Canon Files for New Shutter Patient https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2022/3/canon-files-for-new-shutter-patient Canon New Shutter PatientCanon New Shutter PatientScreenshot

Canon Patent Application: Shutter that minimizes shutter shock

In this patent application Canon is investigation shutters that minimize shutter shock.

If you are not aware, especially on mirrorless cameras there is a phenomenon called shutter shock, which very simplistically is that vibration from the mechanical shutter that can cause blur or a loss of resolution especially at slower shutter speeds starting at 1/100th of a second to around 1/8th of a second and sometimes slower.  This happens more frequently on a mirrorless camera because there are more actions the shutter has to perform because the sensor is normally exposed and open.  The shutter has to first close before exposing the image. These actions are a lot more than what a DSLR does.  This amplifies the vibration effect on mirrorless cameras more than DSLRs did in the past.

Canon looks to combat this with a floating shutter assembly.

They first attempted to do this with a floating shutter;

an image pickup device that holds a shutter in a floating state so as to be movable only in the traveling direction of the shutter blade by using a spring, and absorbs vibration due to the traveling of the shutter blade however, they found was not accurate enough.

And in this patent application, they describe a mechanism that uses electromagnets to move the shutter instead which reduces the amount of vibration caused by the assembly. (Thanks for the clarification - I'll blame it on 60 hours' worth of jetlag still).

This is pretty cool and could be useful on cheaper cameras that Canon makes in the future that do not have a global shutter - which of course eliminates this completely.

Canon New Shutter Patient-1Canon New Shutter Patient-1Screenshot

Canon patent application 2022-039332 (Japan) discusses technologies to reduce “shutter shock”, i.e. mechanical vibrations induced by the shutter movement.

[Problem] To provide an imaging apparatus in which vibration generated by a shutter hardly propagates to another portion and a shutter is highly accurately positioned.
[Means for solving] An imaging device 100 is provided with an imaging element 103 a for picking up an image of an object, and a shutter 110 for driving the shutter blade 302 and controlling the exposure time of the imaging element ; This device has a holding member 120 for holding a shutter so as to be movable in a plane orthogonal to an imaging optical axis, and 1 urging members 402 a to 402 c for energizing the shutter in the 1 direction in the plane. The shutter has abutting portions 120 g to 120 I which contact the positioning portions 1 g to 301 I provided on the holding member and position the shutter at a predetermined position in the 301 direction. The shutter is movable from a predetermined position against an urging force of a 1 urging member, and the imaging device has 1 cushioning members 404 a and 404 b which contact a shutter which returns to a predetermined position by the energizing force of the 1 urging member.

This post was originally published by - CanonNews 

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) Canon Canon EOS R5 Canon Patient 2022-039332 Canon Shutter Patient Electromagnet Shutter EOS R5 https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2022/3/canon-files-for-new-shutter-patient Thu, 10 Mar 2022 23:15:00 GMT
Canon to Release the EOS R1 in 4th Quarter of 2022 https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2022/3/canon-to-release-the-eos-r1 Camob EOS R1Camob EOS R1

Canon to Release the EOS R1, a High-Resolution Camera, and More

Canon has multiple EOS R cameras and a super-telephoto lens on the way.

Since the release of the EOS R3, a powerful, pro-level model for sports and action shooters, Canon has remained quiet, with a few minor exceptions (including the announcement of the RF 800mm f/5.6L and the RF 1200mm f/8L, two super-telephoto lenses that cost a whopping $17000 and $20000, respectively).

Fortunately, new cameras and lenses are coming later this year, and while they will cater to serious professionals, you can most likely expect prices in the four-figure – not five-figure! – range.

According to Canon Rumors, Canon will announce the EOS R1, the company’s first mirrorless flagship camera, before the year is out. The R1 will offer a combination of high-resolution imaging and lightning-fast shooting for sports photographers, wildlife photographers, photojournalists, and any other professionals in need of top-notch capabilities. 

When the EOS R1 debuts, it will be a first for Canon; until now, Canon’s high-end professional cameras have offered either action specs (the Canon 1D X Mark III, the Canon EOS R3) or a high-resolution sensor (the Canon 5DS). The EOS R5 threatened to bridge this gap, but despite its impressive 40+ MP sensor and 20 FPS shooting speeds, its design is that of a jack-of-all-trades professional body, not a flagship. 

So what can you expect from a Canon EOS R1?

The EOS R1 will likely boast at least 30 frames-per-second continuous-shooting speeds, top-notch in-body image stabilization, and groundbreaking autofocus features (including the latest and greatest tracking algorithms for action snappers). 

As for the EOS R1’s sensor: Canon Rumors claims that it will push beyond the 45 MP offered by the EOS R5. A sensor in the 55-65 MP range seems likely, especially as Canon seeks to outperform Sony and its 50 MP a1.

But the EOS R1 will likely fall short of a 70+ megapixel sensor. As Canon Rumors explains, while Canon is “not going to let Sony have that [high-resolution] crown for long,” the company will be releasing a second camera, designed specifically for high-res imaging and packing a 75 MP sensor. 

When will these new cameras drop? 

The EOS R1 should “begin shipping in Q4 of 2022,” though “an announcement may come as early as Q3.” In other words, we shouldn’t have too long to wait. 

The high-megapixel camera is more of an unknown, but a release date in the next 15 months would make sense, especially as Canon seeks to compete with the Sony a1 and Nikon Z9.

Note that, initially, Canon aimed to release the EOS R1 alongside a super-telephoto lens – most likely a 500mm f/4.5 or f/5 model. But “production delays may force Canon to do just a development announcement for [the] lens this year.” 

Canon EOS R1 specs (grain of salt required!)

• Approx. 85MP global shutter CMOS imaging sensor
• Approx. 85MP at 20fps, 21MP at 40fps unlimited continued shooting
• Full Sensor Large Quad Pixel Auto-focus technology
• 15.5 EV+ wide dynamic range
• ISO 160-1638400
• 5-axis IBIS up to 9 stop
• 3.5” 9.33MP 1280nit 10-bit WCG RGB-OLED touch screen with 120Hz AE-AF
• 9.44MP 120Hz SuperSpeed AE-AF electronic viewfinder
• Price $8,500 in USA

Now over to you:

Which Canon cameras do you hope to see this year? Which would you be interested in purchasing? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

This post was originally published by Digital Photography School/Jaymes Dempsey  - March 7, 2022

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) Canon Canon EOS R1 Canon EOS R5 EOS R1 EOS R5 Rumors" Sports Photography https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2022/3/canon-to-release-the-eos-r1 Tue, 08 Mar 2022 04:53:32 GMT
Canon Plans to Release 32 RF-Mount Lenses in the Next Four Years https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2022/3/canon-plans-to-release-32-rf-mount-lenses-in-the-next-four-years Canon 32 New LensesCanon 32 New LensesScreenshot

Canon Inc. has published its Corporate Strategy Conference 2022 presentation materials, revealing a number of interesting tidbits about the company’s past fiscal year and what it intends to do going forwards as part of its growth strategy.

Under the headline ‘2021 Results and Future Growth Strategy,’ Canon says part of its ‘Growth Strategy’ is to ‘develop imaging business centered on optical technology.’ Specifically, Canon says it wants to expand the scale of its optical technology by ‘cultivating new users’ and ‘developing new products.’ As a result, it hopes to target one trillion yen in imaging group sales, annually.

Canon says it maintains ‘firm demand among professionals and advanced amateurs,’ but does admit the ‘market as a whole seems to be bottoming out.’ To achieve its one trillion yen goal, Canon says it plans to ‘further enhance [its] lineup of EOS R system cameras and lenses,’ specifically stating it hopes to ‘expand [its] lens lineup at the same pace as it has between 2020 and 2021. That would mean Canon plans to release at least eight lenses each year from 2022 through 2025, for a total of 32 lenses. That would mean Canon plans to more than double its current lens lineup from 26 lenses to 58 lenses in roughly the same amount of time since the RF mount was announced in 2018.
 

Another part of Canon's growth strategy is to further develop its concept cameras, such as those it showed off at CES 2020, including the Canon IVY REC and its monocle-style PowerShot Zoom camera, which was released in Japan in September 2020.
 

Canon 32 New Lens GrowthCanon 32 New Lens GrowthScreenshot

If Canon is to achieve its goal of eight new lenses each year, it’s shaping up to be a busy year for Canon engineers and factory workers. But Canon says it’s off to a ‘good start towards achieving [its] 2025 targets’ and as the chip shortage starts to improve over the next year or two, it should be easier to get more products out of the factory and into the hands of end-users.
 

This post was originally published by DP Review/Gannon Burgett - March 7th, 2022
 

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) 32 B&H Photo Camera Canon Canon EOS R5 Canon EOS R6 EOS R5 EOS R6 Lenses" New Rockbrook Tempe Camera https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2022/3/canon-plans-to-release-32-rf-mount-lenses-in-the-next-four-years Mon, 07 Mar 2022 22:45:00 GMT
Go Long - Canon Announces $17K 800mm F5.6 & $20K 1200mm F8 RF Lenses https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2022/2/canon-announces-17k-800mm-f5-6-20k-1200mm-f8-rf-lenses Canon RF 800mm & RF 1200mmCanon RF 800mm & RF 1200mm

On the 35th anniversary of Canon’s EOS line, the company has announced two new RF-mount super-telephoto lenses: the RF 800mm F5.6 L IS USM and RF 1200mm F8 L IS USM. While these lenses are similar in name to their EF counterparts, both lenses feature new optical constructions and weigh quite a bit less.

CANON PRESS RELEASE:

Go Long: Canon Introduces the RF800mm F5.6 L IS USM 
and RF1200mm F8 L IS USM Super-Telephoto Lenses

The Newest RF Lenses are Ideal for Outdoor Sports, Motor Sports, 
Wildlife Photography, Photo News Journalism, and More

MELVILLE, NY, February 23, 2022 — Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, is excited to announce that the Canon RF lens family is growing by two, with the addition of the Canon RF800mm F5.6 L IS USM, and the longest focal length RF lens yet, the RF1200mm F8 L IS USM. Both super-telephoto fixed focal length lenses are quite light for their considerable abilities, and share many of the same features such as Super Spectra Coating (SSC) and Air Sphere Coating (ASC) to help minimize ghosting and flaring, compatibility with both the RF1.4x and RF2x extenders and a customizable electronic focusing ring with manual focus capability during Servo AF.

Additional features shared by both lenses include:

  • Two focus presets, with the ability to instantly switch between memorized focus distances
  • Circular nine-bladed aperture providing photographers with exceptionally beautiful and soft blurred backgrounds and bokeh
  • Renowned Canon L-Series durability and construction with dust and water resistance, plus fluorine coating on the front element for easy cleaning

Canon RF800mm F5.6L IS USM

The RF800mm F5.6 L IS USM weighs in at just 6.9 lbs and features a minimum focusing distance of 8.53ft/2.6 meters — maximum close-up magnification is a superb 0.34x, allowing wildlife image creators to fill the frame with small subjects, such as birds, at its minimum focusing distance. Optical image stabilization is up to 4.5 stops* of shake correction and includes three IS operation modes. When using the RF1.4x or RF2x extenders, users can experience enhanced effective focal lengths of 1,120mm and 1,600mm respectively.

Canon RF1200mm F8 L IS USM

The RF1200mm F8 L IS USM is the most powerful super-telephoto lens in the Canon RF lens line. It weighs in at 7.4 lbs — an outstandingly light figure for a super-tele lens of this type — and features a minimum focusing distance of 14.1ft/4.3m. Optical image stabilization is up to 4.0 stops* of shake correction and, similar to the RF800mm F5.6 L IS USM lens, includes three IS operation modes. When using the RF1.4x or RF2x extenders, users can experience enhanced focal lengths of 1,680mm and 2,400mm, respectively.

Pricing and Availability

The Canon RF800mm F5.6 L IS USM and Canon RF1200mm F8 L IS USM are both scheduled to be available in late May 2022 for an estimated retail price of $16,999.00 and $19,999.00, respectively**. For more information please visit usa.canon.com.

Canon 800mm F5.6 L IS USM Specifications

Principal specifications
Lens type Prime lens
Max Format size 35mm FF
Focal length 800 mm
Image stabilization Yes
CIPA Image stabilization rating 4 stop(s)
Lens mount Canon RF
Aperture
Maximum aperture F5.6
Minimum aperture F64
Aperture ring No
Number of diaphragm blades 9
Aperture notes Rounded blades
Optics
Elements 26
Groups 18
Special elements / coatings 2 Fluorite, 1 Super UD, 1 UD (Ultra-low Dispersion).
Focus
Minimum focus 2.60 m (102.36″)
Maximum magnification 0.34×
Autofocus Yes
Motor type Ring-type ultrasonic
Full time manual Yes
Focus method Internal
Distance scale No
DoF scale No
Focus distance limiter • 2.6m – infinity • 2.6m – 20m • 20m – infinity
Physical
Weight 3140 g (6.92 lb)
Diameter 163 mm (6.42″)
Length 432 mm (17.01″)
Sealing Yes
Filter thread 52 mm
Filter notes Filters screw into drop-in holder
Hood supplied Yes
Hood product code ET-155
Tripod collar Yes
Optional accessories Short lens hood (ET-155B)

Canon 1200mm F8 L IS USM Specifications

Principal specifications
Lens type Prime lens
Max Format size 35mm FF
Focal length 1200 mm
Image stabilization Yes
CIPA Image stabilization rating 4 stop(s)
Lens mount Canon RF
Aperture
Maximum aperture F8
Minimum aperture F64
Aperture ring No
Number of diaphragm blades 9
Aperture notes rounded blades
Optics
Elements 26
Groups 18
Special elements / coatings 2 Fluorite, 1 Super UD Lenses, 1 UD (Ultra-low Dispersion)
Focus
Minimum focus 4.30 m (169.29″)
Maximum magnification 0.29×
Autofocus Yes
Motor type Ring-type ultrasonic
Full time manual Yes
Distance scale No
DoF scale No
Focus distance limiter •4.3m – infinity • 4.3m – 30m • 30m – infinity
Physical
Weight 3340 g (7.36 lb)
Diameter 168 mm (6.61″)
Length 537 mm (21.14″)
Sealing Yes
Filter thread 52 mm
Filter notes Filter screws into drop-in holder
Hood supplied Yes
Hood product code ET-160
Tripod collar Yes
Optional accessories ET-160B Short hood

This post was originally published by usa.canon.com - February 23th, 2022

About Canon U.S.A., Inc.
Canon U.S.A., Inc., is a leading provider of consumer, business-to-business, and industrial digital imaging solutions to the United States and to Latin America and the Caribbean markets. With approximately $30.6 billion in global revenue, its parent company, Canon Inc. (NYSE:CAJ), as of 2021 has ranked in the top-five overall in U.S. patents granted for 36 consecutive years and was one of Fortune Magazine's World's Most Admired Companies in 2022. Canon U.S.A. was featured in Newsweek’s Most Loved Workplaces list for 2021, ranking among the top 100 companies for employee happiness and satisfaction at work. Canon U.S.A. is dedicated to its Kyosei philosophy of social and environmental responsibility. To keep apprised of the latest news from Canon U.S.A., sign up for the Company's RSS news feed by visiting www.usa.canon.com/rss and follow us on Twitter @CanonUSA.
 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) Wildlife Photography B&H Photo Canon Canon EOS R5 EOS R5 RF 1200mm RF 800mm RF Lenses Rockbrook Camera Tempe Camera https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2022/2/canon-announces-17k-800mm-f5-6-20k-1200mm-f8-rf-lenses Wed, 23 Feb 2022 22:30:00 GMT
Canon USA Stops Counterfeit Goods into the USA https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2022/2/canon-usa-stops-counterfeit-goods-into-the-usa Canon CounterfeitCanon Counterfeit

Canon U.S.A., Inc. Successfully Stops a New Method of Importing Counterfeit Goods Into the United States

MELVILLE, NY, February 9, 2022 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., and its parent company, Canon Inc. of Japan, are pleased to announce that they have successfully reached an agreement with one of China’s leading logistics and fulfillment companies in a dispute over the warehousing and shipping of counterfeit "Canon" camera batteries into the United States for China-based sellers. As part of the settlement, the fulfillment/shipping company agreed to cease distribution of infringing products to consumers in the United States.

Over the last two years, Canon’s investigation into counterfeiting uncovered a new shipping method that China-based sellers are using to bring their infringing goods into the United States. Instead of shipping the goods directly to consumers in the United States, China-based sellers are now sending their goods in bulk to large fulfillment warehouses that are located in the United States. These warehouses then ship the infringing goods to consumers in the United States. This new method not only enables China-based merchants to indirectly ship their counterfeit goods swiftly to American and Canadian consumers, but also makes it harder for branded manufacturers to track and prevent the flow of counterfeit goods.

"After we discovered that China-based infringers were using this new shipment method to bring counterfeit Canon batteries into the United States, we started working on a creative strategy to remove these counterfeit products from the market. We were able to find an innovative solution by proceeding directly against the fulfillment/warehouser to halt the distribution of these fake goods in the United States," said Seymour Liebman, Executive Vice President, Chief Administrative Officer & General Counsel of Canon U.S.A., Inc. "We believe that we are the first intellectual property owner to successfully stop this new method of importation and distribution, and we hope other companies will follow our lead and utilize this novel approach to stopping counterfeiters."

The Canon companies are represented by Mark Schonfeld, a partner in the Boston office of Burns & Levinson LLP, who negotiated the settlement with the U.S.-based fulfillment company.

Canon aggressively pursues counterfeiters in the United States and around the world to protect its customers from potentially unsafe products that unlawfully use the Canon name, as well as to protect the value, trusted reputation and loyalty that the Canon brand has acquired over decades in producing high quality, safe and reliable products.

For more information about Canon’s anti-counterfeiting measures, please visit https://global.canon/en/intellectual-property/anti-counterfeit/.

About Canon U.S.A., Inc.
Canon U.S.A., Inc., is a leading provider of consumer, business-to-business, and industrial digital imaging solutions to the United States and to Latin America and the Caribbean markets. With approximately $30.6 billion in global revenue, its parent company, Canon Inc. (NYSE:CAJ), as of 2021 has ranked in the top-five overall in U.S. patents granted for 36 consecutive years and was one of Fortune Magazine's World's Most Admired Companies in 2022. Canon U.S.A. was featured in Newsweek’s Most Loved Workplaces list for 2021, ranking among the top 100 companies for employee happiness and satisfaction at work. Canon U.S.A. is dedicated to its Kyosei philosophy of social and environmental responsibility. To keep apprised of the latest news from Canon U.S.A., sign up for the Company's RSS news feed by visiting www.usa.canon.com/rss and follow us on Twitter @CanonUSA.

This post was originally published by USA.Canon.com/Canon USA of Japan - February 11, 2022
 

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) B&H Photo Camera" Canon Canon EOS R5 Canon USA EOS R5 Japan" of R5 Rockbrook Tempe Camera USA https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2022/2/canon-usa-stops-counterfeit-goods-into-the-usa Sat, 12 Feb 2022 02:45:00 GMT
Canon is Shutting Down its Zhuhai Factory https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2022/1/canon-is-shutting-down-its-zhuhai-factory Canon HQCanon HQ

It has been confirmed Canon is in the process of shutting down its Zhuhai manufacturing facility in south China.

On January 14, South China Morning Post reported Canon was planning on shutting down ‘part’ of its production line in its Zhuhai factory in southern China, where it manufactures many of its compact cameras. The move, according to a Canon China public relations representative, was being considered due to the shrinking demand for compact camera systems, problems from the pandemic and the ongoing chip shortage.

Later that day, Reuters shared a similar report, but suggested Canon was considering shutting down the entire factory, not just ‘part’ of the production line. The only site at the time to confirm it would be a full shut down was Canon News, in its coverage of the announcement. After speaking with a Canon representative, DPReview can now also confirm Canon is in the process of shutting down the Zhuhai plant in its entirety.

In a statement to DPReview, Canon Inc. said:

‘It is true that we are planning to cease manufacturing at Canon Zhuhai. With the guidance of the Zhuhai city government and High-Tech Zone authorities, discussions are currently underway with Canon Zhuhai employees, suppliers, and other affiliated parties. As these discussions are currently in progress, we cannot yet disclose any information. Further announcements will be made if and when deemed necessary.’

The ‘High-Tech Zone authorities Canon is referring to are government officials in charge of the Zhuhai National High-Tech Industrial Development District, which is a 9.8 square kilometer (3.8 square mile) district consisting of four industrial parks: Baijiao, Nanping, Sanzao and Zinqing.

According to Canon Asia’s website, 1,325 employees work at the factory, which was built in 1990. Canon Asia says the facility produces digital cameras, digital video cameras and lenses, although the specific models manufactured at this facility are unclear, even after inquiring with a Canon representative.

As Canon’s statement to DPReview notes, discussions are still ongoing and no definitive timeframes have been laid out. We will update this article accordingly when Canon releases any further news on the shuttering of its Zhuhai factory.

According to Canon Asia’s website, 1,325 employees work at the factory, which was built in 1990. Canon Asia says the facility produces digital cameras, digital video cameras and lenses, although the specific models manufactured at this facility are unclear, even after inquiring with a Canon representative.

As Canon’s statement to DPReview notes, discussions are still ongoing and no definitive timeframes have been laid out. We will update this article accordingly when Canon releases any further news on the shuttering of its Zhuhai factory.

This post was originally published by DP Review/Gannon Burgett - January 19, 2022

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) Canon Canon EOS R5 Canon Mirrorless Canon Zhuhai factory EOS R5 https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2022/1/canon-is-shutting-down-its-zhuhai-factory Thu, 20 Jan 2022 02:45:00 GMT
Canon EOS R3 and Canon EOS R5 Compared https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/9/canon-eos-r3-and-canon-eos-r5-compared Canon R3 vs R5Canon R3 vs R5

Introduction

The EOS R3 is Canon's highest-end mirrorless camera yet, but it arrives into a range of already capable cameras. The EOS R5 impressed us a great deal, proving itself a worthy successor to the classic EOS 5D DSLRs, so what does the R3 do that's different, and is it worth the extra money?

The all-around capability of the R5 and the branding of the R3 mean it's not quite as clear-cut as the distinction that existed between the 1D and 5D models. But it still essentially comes down to what you want to use the camera for. Let's take a closer look at the two cameras' respective strengths.

Sensors

We wouldn't usually start a comparison by talking about sensors, but the difference in chip technology between these two cameras is at the heart of most of the other differences between them.

The EOS R5 uses a front-side illuminated CMOS sensor. It performs very well, both in terms of image quality and speed. But using electronic shutter drops to 12-bit mode and still takes around 1/60th of a second to read out the whole sensor, which means no use of flash in e-shutter mode and a risk of moving subjects appearing distorted if they move too much during that 1/60th of a second.

The EOS R3 jumps two generations ahead: skipping conventional BSI fabrication and moving on to a Stacked CMOS that allows much faster readout. The R3's electronic shutter takes around 1/200th of a second to read: approximately 1/3rd as much time. This means flashes can sync at up to 1/180 sec in e-shutter mode and it's much less likely that you'll see any rolling shutter effect. It's only a fraction slower than most mechanical shutters, which typically take around 1/250 sec to traverse the sensor.

This speed difference plays a role in several of the cameras' features, but the most fundamental is that the R3's e-shutter mode can be used for almost all photography, whereas the R5's is more limited.

Shooting speed

The faster burst rate of the EOS R3 puts it more in line with Canon's 1D series of pro sports DSLRs

The difference in readout speed makes a fundamental difference to the circumstances in which you can use the electronic shutter that underpins both camera's fastest modes. So, while it may appear that the R5 can shoot at 20 fps to the R3's 30, in many circumstances it's not advisable to use e-shutter mode.

The difference is that the R3's super-fast readout means e-shutter can be used for shooting even fast-moving subjects at its full 30 frames per second, but the R5 would need to be switched to its 12 fps mechanical shutter mode.

It depends on your tolerance for rolling shutter distortion, of course, and there are scenarios in which capturing the perfect moment but with a slightly elongated subject is good enough. But this isn't likely to be the case for anybody being paid to capture sports photos, and hence the R3 will significantly outperform the R5 for shooting action.

Resolution

Just as with the 1D / 5D relationship, if you're looking for a high-res landscape or studio camera, it's the smaller camera that's a better bet.

The 45MP FSI CMOS chip in the EOS R5 delivers the goods in terms of resolution, and its dynamic range is solid, too. We say solid because, although it measures very much like Sony's a7R IV, there seems to be a little detail smearing noise reduction going on in the shadows of low ISO Raw files to help make the numbers look good.

We've not been able to see if anything similar is happening with the R3, but its 24MP sensor is not going to match the R5 in situations in which detail capture is critical.

Video spec

The EOS R5's higher resolution sensor gives it an edge in terms of video, too. It can shoot 8K footage at up to 30p, which the R3 simply hasn't got enough pixels to keep up with. However, 8K is overkill for a lot of applications; mainly providing scope for cropping or down sampling, to give more detail than native 4K capture can achieve.

And it is in this second regard that the R3 starts to close the gap a little. It can't quite match the detail levels of the R5's 4K-from-8K, but its 4K footage at 60 fps or slower is all taken from the full 6K width of its sensor (in DCI mode, anyway*). So you can get 1.5x over sampled 4K footage at up to 60p, which the R5 can't do. The R3 also has connectors in its hot shoe that allow the attachment of an external XLR mic adapter.

Then, of course, there's the consideration of heat build-up. Both cameras have thermal limits in their more demanding video modes, but Canon says there's no particular restriction on 4K (from 6K) shooting at up to 30p, whereas the R5's over sampled 4K shooting duration is limited and gets cut into by any prior use of the camera. Overall, the R3, with its larger battery, is likely to be the more usable video tool.

Canon R3 Top SideCanon R3 Top Side

Viewfinder/screens

In terms of screens, both cameras have side-hinged fully-articulating rear touchscreens, well suited for video and tripod work but perhaps not ideal for portrait-orientation shooting. The R3 has the more detailed LCD panel, with 4.15M dots giving a resolution of 1440 x 960 pixels, rather than the 1024 x 680 pixels that the R5's 2.1M dot screen can deliver.

There's a difference in terms of the viewfinders, too, even though the specs don't necessarily give it away. Both have 5.76M dot panels with 0.76x magnification, the same 23mm eyepoint, and the same -4.0 to +2.0 diopter adjustment. Both can be run at 120Hz if you engage 'Smooth' refresh mode, but the R3's viewfinder also has an 'Optical Viewfinder Simulation' mode, which exploits the viewfinder panel's wide dynamic range to give a more realistic view of the world. Our initial impression is also that the R5 doesn't necessarily always utilize the full resolution of its panel.

AF performance

The EOS R3 has a more sophisticated autofocus system, partly because it's a newer camera, but mainly because action is such a core part of the audience it's targetting.

Both cameras have subject tracking that will try to recognize and prioritize people when asked to track human subjects. This taps into a system trained by machine learning that recognizes eyes, faces and heads, so that it will continue to track your subject even if they turn away from the camera (rather than refocusing to other faces in your scene, for instance).

Both cameras can also recognize and track a variety of birds and animals, if told to do so. The R3's AF system also has a mode that's been trained for motorsports and is able to track racing cars and motorbikes, with an option to home-in on riders' and drivers' helmets, if you wish.

We've not shot the two cameras alongside one another in challenging conditions but our initial impressions are that the R3's AF is a little bit better at sticking to subjects and also possibly a little faster, as befits its sports and wildlife focus. The faster readout of the sensor allows the R3 to update its AF calculations 60 times a second, which is more frequent than in the R5.

Eye Control AF

Beyond the differences in types of work the two cameras are designed to do, the biggest difference between the R5 and R3 is the presence of Eye Control AF in the R3.

The reintroduced Eye Control system is designed to be a genuinely intuitive way to very quickly position your autofocus point, to select a subject. It's especially well suited to the fast-moving subjects the R3 is designed to shoot, where saving fractions of a second in selecting a subject is more valuable than placing the AF point with great precision.

However, while this means it's far from essential for R5 users shooting landscape or product photos, it's a feature that might make the R3 a more attractive option for wedding photographers, where capturing a fleeting moment can be more important than providing the additional resolution the R5 offers.

Canon R3 EthernetCanon R3 Ethernet

Connection options

Another significant area of difference between the EOS R5 and R3 is the two camera's connection options, relative to one another. The R3 includes a number of additional options that speak to its very specific intended user-base.

So, while both cameras have built-in Wi-Fi that allows images to be transferred to a smartphone or home computer, the EOS R3 gains a multi-purpose connector in its hot shoe (pictured) that adds the option to connect a smartphone via a USB connection and take advantage of 5G connectivity. The larger camera also has a built-in Ethernet port for rapid image offloading when shooting on the sidelines of sporting events.

As we mentioned earlier, the multi-purpose hot shoe also allows the addition of an adaptor for connecting XLR microphones, further boosting the camera's video-shooting credentials.

Sadly, in both instances, the cameras are equipped with micro, type-D HDMI sockets, which are not the most rugged or reliable way to connect the cameras to external monitors, recorders or TVs.

Battery life

If you use the rear LCD, the R5 is rated as delivering a rather low 320 shots per charge, whereas the larger battery of the R3 is rated as delivering a downright impressive 760 shots per charge. As always, ratings derived from CIPA's standard test method tend to under-represent the number of shots you're likely to get in practice, but a rating of 760 shots will usually be more than sufficient for even the most intensive shooting session, a rating of 320 is more likely to see you run out of juice.

Bigger challenges come when you use the cameras' electronic viewfinders (and both have been designed to be as DSLR-like as possible, so we suspect you'll do so pretty often). In their 'smooth' modes, which give the most responsive view through the viewfinder, the figures drop dramatically. The R3 is rated as giving 440 shots per charge while the R5 promises just 220 shots, which are low-enough numbers that you'll need to have a second battery on-hand for the R3 and maybe consider buying a battery grip for the R5, especially for extended shoots.

These numbers improve considerably if you drop the cameras into battery-saving mode, but for fast action, most R3 shooters are going to need the camera's faster viewfinder refresh rate. So, whereas for some applications, R5 users can get their viewfinder rating up to 320 in power saving mode, R3 users are less likely to be able to use the mode that boosts the rating to a much more healthy 620 shots per charge.

Wrap-up

The R3 and R5, along with the launch of a range of high-end L-series lenses for the RF mount, make it clear that Canon expects the future of high-end photography to be mirrorless. Both are capable cameras and in most instances, the decision between them is primarily a question of what and how you shoot.

For an awful lot of applications, the R5's blend of speed and resolution will prove to be more than sufficient. But for fast-moving subjects, the R3 offers even faster shooting and greater battery life, even before you consider the added responsiveness that Eye Control AF offers. The R3 is also the better video rig, despite not being able to shoot 8K, simply because its over sampled 4K capture (up to 30p) shouldn't be limited by overheating, meaning it'll also be more reliable if you need to shoot both video and stills.

It's perhaps mainly wedding photographers who'll find themselves caught in two minds. An R5/R3 pair would let you deliver resolution for some shots and immediacy when you need it, but the cost of such a setup is considerable.

Depending on what and how you shoot, an R5 with a battery grip is likely to be the most sensible option for a lot of people: the EOS R3 is a more powerful camera with better performance, but it's also 50% more expensive. That said, once you've experienced Eye Control, you may choose to wait in hope of an EOS R5 Mk II with that feature added.

Camera Decision R3 vs R5Camera Decision R3 vs R5

In this review, we will be comparing R3 and R5, two Pro Mirrorless cameras by Canon. Canon R3 was introduced to market in September 2021 and Canon R5 was launched in July 2020. There is 14 months difference between R3 and R5 so we don't expect to see a huge technology difference between these two cameras but it would still give an advantage to younger R3, especially in sensor tech.

We can expect this to be a close match up because both models are ranked amongst the best in Pro Mirrorless cameras. Out of 56 cameras in this class, Canon R3 is ranked #7 with an overall score of 94 and Canon R5 is ranked #9 with an overall score of 93.

This post was originally published by DP Review/Richard Butler - September 29, 2021 - Image of Review by Camera Decisions

Logo B&H PhotoLogo B&H Photo

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1634981-REG/canon_eos_r3_mirrorless_digital.html

Logo Rockbrook CameraLogo Rockbrook Camera

https://www.rockbrookcamera.com/products/canon-eos-r3?_pos=1&_sid=c2bf35e98&_ss=r

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) B&H Photo Canon Canon EOS R3 Canon EOS R5 EOS R3 EOS R5 R3 R5 Rockbrook Camera Tempe Camera https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/9/canon-eos-r3-and-canon-eos-r5-compared Wed, 29 Sep 2021 15:15:00 GMT
Three Moments with the Canon EOS R3 That Changed My Opinion of Eye Control https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/9/three-moments-with-the-canon-eos-r3-that-changed-my-opinion-of-eye-control Canon R3 EVFCanon R3 EVF

The EOS R3's Eye Control system works on a similar principle to the one used in the late 90's and early 2000s, but isn't really trying to select individual, discrete AF points

To me, Eye Control has always been some great 'what if,' that inevitably gets mentioned when camera geeks of a certain age spent too much time together. I went straight from a manual focus SLR to digital cameras, so I've never felt those pangs of nostalgia, myself: it just sounded like a failed technology that even Canon seemed happy to forget about.

But in the past months there have been three distinct moments that have made me think that, rather than being an evolutionary dead-end, the Eye Control concept (and maybe technologies similar to it) might come to be seen as a critical feature of cameras in the future.

Recognition of necessity

The first moment came when Canon, in the first of its drip-feeds of R3 specs, announced that it would be reviving the Eye Control idea. My initial thought was 'well, technology has moved on long way since the early 2000s, they can probably get it to work better,' but the more I thought about it, the more I wondered whether something like it has become necessary.

Back in the era of the EOS 5 and EOS-3, Eye Control was an interesting idea, but not really an essential one. The EOS 5 had just five AF points to select from, and even in its most ambitious implementation, the EOS-3's system could move between forty five autofocus points. The new EOS R3 has one thousand and fifty three.

The move to mirrorless has seen AF arrays extend across almost the whole field-of-view, and the number of selectable AF points stretch into and through the hundreds. The joysticks and button presses we've become used to simply aren't up to the job. Even Canon's own infrared swipeable Smart Controller struggles.

Intuitive to the point of invisibility

The second pang of recognition came when we were shooting football (soccer) with the EOS R3. I've shot sports with high-end cameras before, but I wouldn't consider myself particularly adept at it. I can sometimes set up the camera to do what I want, and I can sometimes focus enough on the action to anticipate what's might happen next, but I've only had fleeting periods where those two have overlapped.

The Eye Control interface seems initially chaotic and overwhelming: there's an AF box which is typically white, grey indicators around any potential subjects that the camera has recognized, which will occasionally go white if they're very close to the AF point finally there's the Eye Control target itself, dancing around the screen. Frankly, it seems too much.

Canon R3 Viewfinder MockupCanon R3 Viewfinder Mockup

As soon as I consciously noticed the Eye Control point was following the ball, I started looking at the control point instead, but having recognized that it was outlining the ball, my eye continued to follow the indicator/ball combination I'd created

But once I'd started shooting, I found myself just concentrating on following and predicting the movement in the game. Then, for a brief moment, I became aware again of the Eye Control indicator, perfectly matching the size, position and movement of the football as it rolled from one player's feet to the next.

In that sudden moment of noticing the Eye Control point and what it was doing, I realized that I hadn't been paying it any attention before: I'd just been watching the players and the camera had been focusing on the player I'd been looking at. And, while none of this helped me position myself in the right place on the sidelines for those decisive moments in the game, it did mean I came back with better action shots (and more of them) than I'm used to getting.

At its best, Eye Control isn't just about more quickly selecting an AF point, it's also about it doing so in a way that's almost subconscious. I was setting focus without ever having to consciously think about focus, giving me one less thing to think about and leave me more able to concentrate on the game.

How will I live without it?

The moment that really sold me on the idea of Eye Control came just a few hours later. We'd finished up at the sports field and we'd headed down to the zoo to get some more shots. Alongside shooting the EOS R3 I was meant to be capturing some behind-the-scenes photos for social media.

A perfect moment presented itself: Chris and Carey, long-lensed cameras in hand were walking into a patch of light between an arch of trees. Both were gesticulating at one another, animatedly discussing some camera feature or another. Perfect, I thought, raising the camera to my eye.

I found that I'd become so used to a feature after just a few hours' shooting, that it's become something I want in my next camera.

I looked determinedly at Chris, and waited for him to take one step further forward. But, just as I was about to hit the shutter, I saw that the AF point was stubbornly glued to the lower right corner of the viewfinder. Had I messed up the calibration? Was there a blind spot which pushes the AF target beyond a point from which I could coax it back? What was I doing wrong? It was only when Chris stepped fully into shadow and the moment had passed that I noticed that there was no Eye Control indicator to be seen. And why would there be? The EOS R6 I was holding doesn't have Eye Control AF.

In that third moment of realization, I found that I'd become so used to a feature after just a few hours' shooting, that it's become something I want in my next camera. From historical footnote to a technology of the future in no time at all. Now we just have to see how reliable it is.

This post was originally published by DP Review/Richard Butler - September 19, 2021

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) B&H Photo Canon Canon Mirrorless R3 EVF R3" Tempe Camera https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/9/three-moments-with-the-canon-eos-r3-that-changed-my-opinion-of-eye-control Mon, 20 Sep 2021 05:30:00 GMT
Canon Releases 2Q 2021 Financial Results https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/7/canon-releases-2q-2021-financial-results Canon releases Financial results for the 2nd Quarter 2021

Canon Financials 2021-2QCanon Financials 2021-2Q

Canon today posted their 2nd quarter financials and the results were encouraging overall for the company with sales and profits rebounding from 2020's COVID-related struggles.  As a result, Canon is increasing its financial projections for the remainder of the year - but not by much.  As they note, they are still a little concerned with the rise in cases in some parts of the world, as COVID continues to sweep through hotspots in the world.

For imaging, they are increasing their sales projections from 617 billion yen to 661 billion yen. and projecting a dramatic increase in profit from 31 billion to 71 billion (essentially the margin increasing from 5% to 10%)

Canon expects the total camera market to be around 6 million units this year with Canon neatly taking 50% of that market with 3 million unit sales.

Canon stated in their summary;

Demand for cameras is growing steadily thanks to the strength of consumer spending in the United States and elsewhere, and the increasing number of people picking up cameras as a hobby and image expression as a new way of using time amid the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, we raised our outlook for the size of the global camera market by 200 thousand units and now expect the overall size to be 6 million units for the full year.

In the second quarter, the share of total sales attributable to the EOS R5 and EOS R6, for which sales remain strong, has increased more than expected.

In addition to this, the number of full-frame mirrorless camera users who purchase RF lenses has been accelerating since the launch of the R5 and R6, creating a situation where we cannot supply some products in a timely manner.

Buried a little deeper in their summary, Canon expects digital compact cameras to continue to fall, with sales going from 1.48 million units last year to around 1.25 million this year.  But with no new models (and none really even rumored) I'm not sure this is much of a surprise, as compacts, EF, and EOS-M are all notably missing from Canon's writeups and have been for more than a few quarters. As it should - Canon has a mount install base in the 10's of millions if not more with the EF mount, once the RF mount picks up enough momentum, that's a huge market that Canon is looking at moving over to the RF mount.

This post was originally published by CanonNews/

 

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) Canon Canon Releases 2Q 2021 Financial Results Financials https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/7/canon-releases-2q-2021-financial-results Thu, 29 Jul 2021 05:00:00 GMT
Canon Establishes Professional Photo Center Inside The Tokyo 2020 Olympic Main Press Center https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/7/canon-establishes-professional-photo-center-inside-the-tokyo-2020-main-press-center TOKYO, July 19, 2021—Canon Inc. and Canon Marketing Japan Inc. announced today that the company will establish a photo service center for professional photographers in the Main Press Center (MPC), where members of the international press gather, during the Olympic and Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 (henceforth, Tokyo 2020 Games) with the purpose of ensuring photographers are as best-equipped as possible to capture exciting and definitive moments of top-class athletes.
Canon 2021 Olympics-2Canon 2021 Olympics-2

(Canon establishes professional photographer Photo service center inside the Tokyo 2020 Main Press Center)

Professional photographers around the world require camera manufacturers to develop state-of-the-art technologies and top-class-performance equipment, as well as provide a comprehensive network of meticulous service and support.

Thus far, Canon has provided on-site support for press photographers, including camera and lens maintenance and technological support, behind the scenes at major sporting events around the world. The Tokyo 2020 Games are no exception—there too, Canon will apply its professional support know-how acquired over its long history in order to provide flexible and appropriate support for photographers and the various requests and equipment troubles they may have.

The Tokyo 2020 Games Main Press Center, located in the West Hall of the Tokyo Big Sight convention center, is expected to receive many members of the international press. As a Gold Partner of the Tokyo 2020 Games (still cameras and desktop printers), Canon aims to contribute to the successful operation of the event. With this goal in mind, the company will establish the largest camera photo service center of this event within the MPC.

Canon 2021 OlympicsCanon 2021 Olympics

At the photo service center, which will operate under the motto of "Zero Downtime" to ensure that photographers don't miss their chance at capturing decisive moments of this intense competition due to equipment trouble or other such problems, Canon will provide speedy maintenance service, equipment repairs and loaning of replacement equipment so that photographers can always be ready and in the best possible condition.

The Canon photo service center will provide such equipment as the company's professional flagship camera, the EOS-1D X Mark III, as well as the EOS R5 and EOS R6 mirrorless cameras and super-telephoto lenses. In addition, elite and highly trained staff will be working on-site to support photographers until the end of the closing ceremonies of the Tokyo 2020 Games.

In addition, Canon's remote camera system will be used at the event venues. The Robotic Camera System CR-S700R enables digital interchangeable-lens cameras (DILC) to be operated remotely, including the ability to adjust shooting angles, and can be installed and used in locations at the event areas where human photographers cannot access, such as from ceilings.

Canon strives to support photographers aiming to capture historic and powerful moments of top-class athletes engaged in fierce competition and contribute to the promotion and development of photographic culture. In addition, the company will support the efforts of the media to deliver to people around the world moments of passion and excitement during the sporting world's premiere event, thus contributing to the promotion of the Olympic and Paralympic movement.

Canon 2021 Olympics-1Canon 2021 Olympics-1Screenshot

A "sea of white" at a sporting event, Canon adopts a white paint coating for its L-series telephoto and super-telephoto lenses.

Canon developed the signature white of its lens barrels as a tool for photographers at international sporting events. The first such lenses* produced by the company, the FD600mm f/4.5 S.S.C. and FD800mm f/5.6 S.S.C. large-diameter super-telephoto lenses, were released in June 1976.

Compared with standard lenses, super-telephoto lenses are much larger, and therefore more prone to the effects of sunlight and are frequently used under the intense heat of the summer sun.

In order to reduce the adverse effects that heat has on the lens' optical performance, Canon adopted its signature white coating for its lens barrels, which reflects heat more effectively than black. Canon continues to improve this technology through such improvements as a proprietary heat shield lens barrel coating used by the EF400mm f/2.8L IS III USM and EF600mm f/4L IS III USM lenses (released in 2018).

At various sporting events held worldwide, there is often a "sea of white" in the photographers' section—rows upon rows of professionals using Canon lenses. Among photographers, these lenses gained the nickname "white lenses," and the color white came to be known as a marker of a high-performance professional lens.

  • *Among lenses for interchangeable-lens cameras. The lenses were used with the TV2000mm f/11 super-telephoto lens (released in September 1960) for broadcast cameras for broadcasting baseball matches.

This post was originally published by Canon Inc/Canon Marketing Japan Inc. - July 19, 2021

 

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) 2020 Games 2021 Olympics 2021 Tokyo Olympics Canon Canon R5 Canon R6 EOS-1D X Mark III R5 R6 https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/7/canon-establishes-professional-photo-center-inside-the-tokyo-2020-main-press-center Tue, 20 Jul 2021 05:00:00 GMT
Canon Launches RF 14-35mm F4 L IS USM Wide-angle Zoom Lens https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/6/canon-launches-rf-14-35mm-f4-l-is-usm-wide-angle-zoom-lens RF 100mm F2.8RF 100mm F2.8

Canon has announced the RF 14-35mm F4 L IS USM, a more affordable wide-angle alternative to its existing RF 15-35mm F2.8. the new lens covers the broadest range of focal lengths of any current Canon zoom. Autofocus is taken care of via a Nano USM motor and it offers a maximum magnification of 0.38x at its maximum zoom setting.

The stabilized zoom lens offers up to 5.5 stops of correction, which increases to 7 stops when used on an RF camera with in-body stabilization. It includes both Canon's Sub-wavelength Structure Coating (SWC) and Air Sphere Coating (ASC), to minimize ghosting and flare.

The RF 14-35mm F4 L IS USM will be available in August at a recommended price of $1700.

Press release:

MELVILLE, NY, June 29, 2021– Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced the RF14-35mm F4 L IS USM lens. This dramatic new lens brings 14mm, ultra wide-angle coverage to full-frame EOS R-series users. On top of the ultra-wide capabilities, the 14-35mm zoom range is the broadest ever in a Canon wide-angle zoom for full-frame AF cameras. For many Canon users, one single lens can potentially handle all wide-angle needs, from vivid, creative ultra-wide imagery to traditional street photography.

The new wide-angle lens is designed for use within the expanding family of EOS R full-frame mirrorless cameras, including the upcoming EOS R3, currently in development. Whether you capture stills, video, or like many creatives today – both – this new wide-angle lens from Canon can help elevate users’ content game when capturing images or video in a wide variety of situations, such as landscape, architecture, and travel.

A compact overall design, and extremely modest overall weight of just 1.2 lbs. — along with excellent balance, during hand-held or even gimbal-mounted operation — add to RF14-35mm F4 L IS USM inviting character. A key feature, sure to appeal to many landscape and nature photographers, is this lens’s ability to accept conventional, 77mm screw-in filters. This is especially noteworthy on a lens for full-frame cameras with 14mm ultra-wide coverage. Additionally, the lens’s close-focusing capability is exceptional for an ultra-wide zoom of its type.

Image Stabilization further enhances the RF14-35mm’s appeal for low-light still imagery, and for steady yet striking wide video footage. Up to 5.5 stops{1} of optical Image Stabilization is built-in, and Coordinated IS with cameras such as the EOS R6 and EOS R5 delivers up to 7 stops{2} of shake-correction. This can mean sharper hand-held images in low light, even at extremely slow shutter speeds.

The Canon RF 14-35mm F4 L IS USM lens features a bright, constant f/4 maximum aperture, L-Series optical construction — highlighted by three UD-glass elements, and three Aspherical elements — and many of the company’s most advanced proprietary lens coatings, including Sub-wavelength Structure Coating (SWC) and Air Sphere Coating (ASC). These superb lens coatings help minimize ghosting and flaring. Lens placement and coatings are also optimized to help users get clear, high-contrast images, even when there is a bright light source either in, or immediately outside, the frame. Additional features of the Canon RF14-35mm F4 L IS USM include:

  • Compact design — Approximately 1.2 lbs. in weight.
  • Minimum focusing of 7.9 inches at all focal lengths and a maximum magnification of 0.38x at 35mm zoom setting.
  • Optical Image Stabilizer with up to 5.5 stops{1} of shake correction.
  • Up to 7 stops{2} of shake correction when paired with Canon EOS R series cameras that feature In-Body Image Stabilizer (IBIS).
  • High speed, smooth and quiet autofocus with Canon’s Nano USM.
  • Control Ring for direct setting changes of aperture, shutter speed, ISO speed and exposure compensation.
  • Superb dust and weather-resistance on par with other Canon L-series lenses.

Pricing and Availability
The Canon RF14-35mm F4 L IS USM lens is scheduled to be available in August 2021 for an estimated retail price of $1,699.00*. For additional information, please visit usa.canon.com.

About Canon U.S.A., Inc.
Canon U.S.A., Inc., is a leading provider of consumer, business-to-business, and industrial digital imaging solutions to the United States and to Latin America and the Caribbean markets. With approximately $30.4 billion in global revenue, its parent company, Canon Inc. (NYSE:CAJ), ranks third overall in U.S. patents granted in 2020† and is one of Fortune Magazine's World's Most Admired Companies in 2020. Canon U.S.A. is dedicated to its Kyosei philosophy of social and environmental responsibility. To keep apprised of the latest news from Canon U.S.A., sign up for the Company's RSS news feed by visiting www.usa.canon.com/rss and follow us on Twitter @CanonUSA.

Based on weekly patent counts issued by United States Patent and Trademark Office.

*Specifications, availability and prices are subject to change without notice. Actual prices are set by individual dealers and may vary.

[1] Based on CIPA (Camera & Imaging Products Associations) standards. Testing performed at focal length of 35mm, using the EOS R camera.

[2] Based on CIPA (Camera & Imaging Products Associations) standards. Testing performed at focal length of 35mm, using the EOS R5 camera.

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) B&H Photo Canon EOS R5 Canon Lens Canon Mirrorless Canon RF 14-34mm Tempe Camera https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/6/canon-launches-rf-14-35mm-f4-l-is-usm-wide-angle-zoom-lens Wed, 30 Jun 2021 03:30:00 GMT
World’s Longest DSLR Lens Canon EF 1200mm F5.6 Is Up for Sale at Auction in Germany https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/6/world-s-longest-dslr-lens-canon-ef-1200mm-f5-6-is-up-for-sale-at-auction-in-germany A used unit of Canon's EF 1200mm F5.6 L USM lens is set to come up for sale at an auction in Germany slated for 6th October. At 0.8m (2' 7") and weighing a massive 16.5kg (36lbs), the lens offered the world’s longest focal length for an interchangeable SLR lens with autofocus when it was introduced in July 1993, and to the best of my knowledge, that record still holds true.

EF 1200mm F5.6EF 1200mm F5.6

 

The lens is extremely rare, and not only for its original 9.8M Yen/$90,000 price tag but also because it took so long to build—it is said only two were made per year and there are believed to be only a dozen or so in total. Each example was built to order, and extremely large artificial fluorite crystals had to be grown to make two of the lens’s elements.

Amazingly for a lens of its size, it uses only 13 elements in 10 groups, but with the forward part of the barrel measuring 228mm (9") across, those front five elements, which include a biconvex single element in crystal fluorite, are impressively large. Fortunately, the filters go in a back of the lens, and you only need 48mm sized gels.

EF 1200mm F5.6-1EF 1200mm F5.6-1

I’ve actually used this lens on safari and can confirm it is something quite special. Well, when I say ‘used’ I mean I attached my camera to the back of it, looked through it, aimed at something and took a couple of pictures. I wasn’t allowed to move it to where I wanted it though.

B&H had an example in its used stock in 2015 that it listed for $180,000, but it isn’t certain if there’s a guide price for this newly turned-up model as the catalogue has yet to be published. It will go on sale at Wetzlar Camera Auctions on October 9th according to the company’s Facebook page

This post was originally published by DP Review/Damien Demolder - June 9th, 2021

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) B&H Photo Canon Canon EF 1200mm Canon EF Lenses EF Lenses Wetzlar Camera Auctions https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/6/world-s-longest-dslr-lens-canon-ef-1200mm-f5-6-is-up-for-sale-at-auction-in-germany Wed, 09 Jun 2021 20:15:00 GMT
Canon EOS R3: What Lies Ahead For The Future ! https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/5/canon-eos-r3-what-do-we-know---what-can-it-tell-us-about-a-future Canon R3-1Canon R3-1

Stacked Sensor

Canon’s first full-frame, back-illuminated stacked CMOS image sensor in the EOS R3 will deliver substantially faster read-out speeds, and produce much lower "rolling shutter" distortion than previous EOS models

Canon R3 Review-3Canon R3 Review-3

Electronic Shutter

Electronic Shutter operation will take full advantage of the EOS R3’s sensor design. With its superb read-out speeds, continuous shooting up to 30fps (with RAW images), with full AF, in all auto exposure shooting modes, will be available with the EOS R3. And, Speedlite shooting will be possible with the R3’s electronic shutter active.

Canon R3 Review-2Canon R3 Review-2

Autofocus

The EOS R5 and R6 were only the beginning. Using Deep Learning technology, the upcoming EOS R3 will offer enhanced AF performance and tracking capabilities, with even better face-, eye-, head- and body-detection. And now, the EOS R3 will add vehicle subject recognition and tracking, for cars and motorcycles, especially in motorsports environments.

For the first time in an EOS R series camera, Eye Control AF will allow users to set the focus point in the viewfinder, by simply looking at it — for incredibly fast changes in where the camera focuses, or to set the initial point from which the EOS R3’s AF system will track moving subjects.1

1During still-image shooting only, through the electronic viewfinder. Eye Control AF may not be possible, depending upon individual characteristics or shooting conditions, and may not be possible for users wearing bifocal eyeglasses, certain types of sunglasses or mirror sunglasses, or certain hard contact lenses.

Rugged Body

Canon’s upcoming EOS R3 will feature a solid yet lightweight magnesium alloy body and carry forward the integrated vertical grip similar to the 1D series cameras, emphasizing both horizontal and vertical handling for challenging shooting situations. Weather-resistance and durability will equal Canon’s top-of-the-line EOS-1D X Mark III camera. Power will be delivered by the same Canon LP-E19 battery pack that powers the EOS-1D X Mark III. And, the EOS R3 will have three primary input dials, giving familiar operation to current Canon EOS users.

Low-light Performance

Able to autofocus in light as low as EV -7 or more2, along with up to 8 stops3 of Coordinated IS control when used with RF lenses featuring Optical Image Stabilization, the EOS R3 will deliver amazing performance even in remarkably dark areas.

2Still photos, with an f/1.2 lens except RF lenses with a Defocus Smoothing (DS) coating, center AF point, and One-Shot AF, at room temperature and ISO 100.

3Using RF24-105mm F4 L IS USM, in yaw and pitch directions, with f=105mm, and as based on CIPA standards

Video Flexibility

With the EOS R3, you will be able to shoot in high-quality 4K with Canon Log3 and oversampled 4K, and RAW movie internal recording. AF tracking for people, animals and motorsports will be possible while recording video as well.

Network Capabilities

To assist with your professional or personal photo and video endeavors, the EOS R3 will have Wired LAN and 5GHz Wi-Fi4 (11ac equivalent) built-in so you have the flexibility of wired or wireless connections and the necessary support for high-speed image transfer.

4Supports 5GHz Wi-Fi-compatible models only. Specifications may vary depending on country and region

Designed to Deliver

The EOS R3 will feature a multi controller to help you easily select the AF point, quickly change Menu settings, and more. And, the R3 will also be equipped with a smart controller—similar to that on the EOS-1D X Mark III —that lets you quickly shift AF point locations, or a starting point for Servo AF tracking. A Vari-angle LCD will make it easy to compose shots at virtually any angle, and will be touchscreen to enable you to access menus, change settings and more on the fly. And a new accessory shoe will provide options for data communication and power, supporting new accessories.

This post was originally published by Canon USA - April 15th, 2021

 

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) B&H Photo Canon Canon Mirrorless Canon R3 Canon R3 launch Tempe Camera https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/5/canon-eos-r3-what-do-we-know---what-can-it-tell-us-about-a-future Sun, 02 May 2021 06:00:00 GMT
Canon Announces New RF 400mm F/2.8L IS & Canon RF 600mm F/4L IS lenses https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/4/canon-announces-the-new-rf-400mm-f/2-8l-is-canon-rf-600mm-f/4l-is-lenses Canon has announced two telephoto lenses for the RF mount, the Canon RF 400mm f/2.8L IS USM and Canon RF 600mm f/4L IS USM.

Both lenses are anything but inexpensive, the RF 400mm goes for $11,999 and the RF 600mm for $12,999. Both lenses are scheduled to ship in July 2021 and preorders are open.

RF 400mm F2.8RF 400mm F2.8

The Canon RF400mm F2.8L IS USM

Canon RF 400mm f/2.8L IS USM Lens 5053C002 B&H Photo Video (bhphotovideo.com)
 

Focal Length

400mm

Maximum and Minimum Aperture

F2.8-32

Lens Mount Type

RF Mount Canon RF mount; Exclusively for Canon EOS R-series cameras

Minimum Focusing Distance

8.20 ft. / 2.5m

Maximum Magnification

0.17x (Fills frame with subject 7.9 x 5.3 inches / 202 x 135mm in size)

Angle of View

Diagonal: 06°10′

Lens Construction

17 elements in 13 groups

Special Elements

Two Fluorite, One Super UD

Lens Coating

Super Spectra, Fluorine (front & rear elements), ASC

Filter Size Diameter

Ø52 mm (Drop-in filter — Drop-in Screw-type Filter Holder 52 [WIII] included, with 52mm clear Protect Filter)

Aperture Blades

9

Dust/Water Resistance

Supported (Rubber ring on lens mount, focus/playback rings, switch panel and switches)

IS Mode Selection

Provided: mode 1, 2, 3

Optical Image Stabilization

CIPA standard: 5.5 stops (using an EOS R / EOS R5)

Maximum Outer Diameter x Length

Approx. 6.4 in x 14.4 in. / 163mm x 367mm

Weight

Approx. 6.37 lbs. (102 oz.) / 2890g

RF 600mm F4.0RF 600mm F4.0

Canon RF600mm F4L IS USM

Canon RF 600mm f/4L IS USM Lens 5054C002 B&H Photo Video (bhphotovideo.com)
 

Focal Length

600mm

Maximum and Minimum Aperture

F4-32

Lens Mount Type

RF Mount Canon RF mount; Exclusively for Canon EOS R-series cameras

Minimum Focusing Distance

13.78 ft. /4.2m

Maximum Magnification

0.15x

Angle of View

Diagonal: 04°10′

Lens Construction

17 elements in 13 groups

Special Elements

Two Fluorite, One Super UD

Lens Coating

Super Spectra, Fluorine (front & rear elements), ASC

Filter Size Diameter

Ø52 mm (Drop-in filter — Drop-in Screw-type Filter Holder 52 [WIII] included, with 52mm clear Protect Filter)

Aperture Blades

9

Dust/Water Resistance

Supported (Rubber ring on lens mount, focus/playback rings, switch panel and switches)

IS Mode Selection

Provided: mode 1, 2, 3

Optical Image Stabilization

CIPA standard: 5.5 stops (using an EOS R / EOS R5)

Maximum Outer Diameter x Length

Approx. 6.6 in x 18.6 in. / 168mm x 472mm

Weight

Approx. 6.8 lbs. / 3090g

Press Release:

The Canon RF400mm F2.8L IS USM and Canon RF600mm F4L IS USM are both designed to be optically identical to their EF counterparts. The RF400mm and RF600mm weigh in at 6.37 and 6.81 pounds with a minimum focusing distance of 8.2 and 13.8 feet, respectively. Both lenses share many of the same critical features that help professional high-end super-telephoto lenses stand out from the crowd. Those features include:

  • Ideal for a wide variety of shooting situations, including sports, aviation, trains, automotive, and wildlife, such as birding.
  • Optical Image Stabilization with up to 5.5 stops6 of shake correction. Including three IS Operation Modes — still subjects, panning, and irregular movement.
  • Proprietary Canon lens coatings, Super Spectra Coating (SSC), and Air Sphere Coating (ASC) help minimize ghosting and flaring. Lens placement and coatings are optimized to provide users with clear, high-contrast images even when there is a bright light source.
  • Lenses include fluorite and super UD lens elements arranged in such a way to help correct chromatic aberration and make the models more compact. Like the latest Canon EF400mm f/2.8L IS III USM and EF600mm f/4L IS III USM lenses, released in the fall of 2018, weight on these RF-series super-telephotos has been significantly reduced vs. previous-generation Canon super tele designs.
  • Compatible with Canon RF 1.4x and 2x extenders, and feature a customizable electronic focus ring, with manual focus capability during SERVO AF.
  • A nine-blade circular aperture provides users beautiful bokeh and ideally blurred backgrounds when the aperture is stopped down.
  • For added convenience when on a shoot, two focus presets are available. Users can instantly return to one of two memorized focus distances.
  • Rugged Canon L-series dust and water-resistant design with vibration and shock resistance. The front element has been dressed with a fluorine coating for easy cleaning.
  • nfrared reflective pigments with high reflectance and titanium oxide lens barrel coating with silica provide excellent UV weather resistance and heat reduction.
  • Canon RF Lenses Pricing and Availability
    The Canon RF 400mm f/2.8L IS USM and Canon RF 600mm f/4L IS USM are scheduled to be available in July 2021 for an estimated retail price of  $11,999.00 and $12,999.00, respectively.

This post was originally published by Canon Rumors - April 15th, 2021
 

 

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) B&H Photo Camera" Canon Canon Rumors RF 400mm RF 600mm RF 600mm F4.0 RF Lenses RF400mm F2.8 Tempe https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/4/canon-announces-the-new-rf-400mm-f/2-8l-is-canon-rf-600mm-f/4l-is-lenses Thu, 15 Apr 2021 07:30:00 GMT
New Canon RF 100mm F2.8L Macro IS USM https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/4/new-canon-rf-100mm-f2-8l-macro-is-usm Published Apr 14, 2021
 

Canon's new RF 100mm F2.8L Macro IS USM lens is the company's first RF-mount lens designed for close-up photography. Its minimum focus distance is 26cm (10"), giving a maximum magnification of 1.4X. The lens' image stabilization system switches to a 'hybrid' mode when focus distances are short, which activates shift (horizontal and vertical translation) reduction on top of the standard angular shake reduction. During regular shooting, the IS system reduces shake by up to 5 stops on its own and by up to 8 stops when attached to stabilized bodies, such as the EOS R5, according to CIPA standards.

The lens has 17 elements in 13 groups, and uses a Super Spectra coating to reduce flare and ghosting. The lens' autofocus system is powered by 'Dual Nano USM': two Nano USM linear motors ensure quick and silent focus, which afford a significant improvement over the ring-type USM drive found in the previous 100mm Macro. The lens also has a control ring for adjusting settings such as ISO and Exposure Compensation, and is threaded for 67mm filters.

RF 100mm F2.8RF 100mm F2.8

The most interesting feature on the RF 100mm F2.8L is probably its 'spherical aberration' adjustment. Like the Defocus Control feature on some Nikon lenses of yesteryear, it provides a dial (which moves a lens element or elements) that lets shooters adjust the 'character and appearance' of bokeh, as well as the overall softness of the image. It does so by under-correcting or over-correcting spherical aberration to yield either soft-edged or hard-edged background bokeh, respectively, with the opposite effect resulting for foreground bokeh. We'll put the 'SA' feature through its paces when the lens arrives this summer.

As with all Canon recent L-series lenses, the 100mm F2.8 is sealed against dust and moisture, and has a fluorine coating on the front element to repel oil and water.

The Canon RF 100mm F2.8L Macro IS USM will be available in July at an MSRP of $1,400.

Press release:

The Canon RF100mm F2.8 L Macro IS USM lens is not only Canon’s first RF lens designed specifically for macro photography, but also the world’s first[1] medium telephoto macro lens with a maximum magnification of 1.4x. The new lens, designed for both advanced photo enthusiasts and professionals, takes macro photography expression to the next level with the introduction of a spherical aberration (SA) control ring. The SA control ring allows users to change the character and appearance of the bokeh and obtain a softer focus effect with a simple turning of the ring to the desired result.

Additional features of the Canon RF100mm F2.8L Macro IS USM include:

  • Optical Image Stabilizer with up to five stops of Shake Correction[2].
  • When combined with a camera featuring In-Body Image Stabilizer, up to eight stops of shake correction[3] is possible with coordinated operation of Optical and In-Body Image Stabilizer.
  • Hybrid IS helps to compensate for angular and shift camera shake during macro shooting.
  • High-speed, smooth and quiet auto focus with dual nano USM.
  • Customizable control ring that allows photographers to adjust exposure compensation, shutter speed, aperture or ISO.
  • Rugged Canon L-series dust and water-resistant design.

The Canon RF100mm F2.8 L Macro IS USM, Canon RF400mm F2.8 L IS USM and Canon RF600mm F4L IS USM are scheduled to be available in July 2021 for an estimated retail price of $1,399.00, $11,999.00 and $12,999.00, respectively*. For more information, please visit usa.canon.com.

Canon RF 100mm F2.8L Macro IS USM specifications

Principal specifications
Lens type Prime lens
Max Format size 35mm FF
Focal length 100 mm
Image stabilization Yes
CIPA Image stabilization rating 5 stop(s)
Lens mount Canon RF
Aperture
Maximum aperture F2.8
Minimum aperture F32
Aperture ring No
Number of diaphragm blades 9
Optics
Elements 17
Groups 13
Special elements / coatings Super Spectra Coating
Focus
Minimum focus 0.26 m (10.24″)
Maximum magnification 1.4×
Autofocus Yes
Motor type Nano ultrasonic
Full time manual Yes
Focus method Internal
Distance scale No

DOF scale

No
Focus distance limiter Yes
Physical
Weight 730 g (1.61 lb)
Diameter 82 mm (3.23″)
Length 148 mm (5.83″)
Materials Magnesium alloy
Sealing Yes
Color Black
Filter thread 67 mm
Hood supplied Yes

This post was originally published by DP Review staff - April 14th, 2021
 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) B&H Photo Canon Canon EOS R5 Canon Mirrorless EOS EOS R5 Lenses R6 RF RF 100mm RF 100mm F2.8 RF Lens Tempe Camera https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/4/new-canon-rf-100mm-f2-8l-macro-is-usm Thu, 15 Apr 2021 04:15:00 GMT
Canon R5, R6 & EOS-1D X Mark III Firmware Updates https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/3/canon-r5-r6-eos-1d-x-mark-iii-firmware-updates Canon has released firmware updates for the R5, R6 & EOS-1D X Mark III. This has come as a direct result of customer feedback.

The firmware releases are:

EOS R5

Firmware Version 1.3.0 incorporates the following fixes and enhancements:

  1. Adds [Canon Log 3] to [Canon Log settings]. You can select [Canon Log] or [Canon Log 3] from [Canon Log settings] in the Shooting tab of the menu.
  • Support for RAW movies shot with Canon Log3 and RAW (Light) will be available in Cinema RAW Development and in Digital Photo Professional version in a future update.
  • Digital Photo Professional will also support the processing of RAW movies shot in Canon Log3 settings and the application of Viewing LUT in future update.
  1. Adds [RAW (Light)] to the movie recording size and [IPB (Light)] to 8K/4K to enable lower bit rate shooting. These settings can also be selected when RAW+MP4 is set.
  2. Adds a high frame rate of 119.9 fps/100.0 fps to the Full HD movie recording size.
  3. Adds [Electronic full-time MF] to the AF tab of the menu. When a lens is attached, manual focus adjustment is always possible with both One-shot AF and Servo AF.
  4. Adds [6: Monitor Off] to [Shooting info. disp.: Screen info. settings] in the Shooting tab of the menu. This update makes it possible for the camera’s monitor to be turned off at all times during shooting.
  5. The transfer time (estimated value) now displays on the camera monitor during FTP transfer.
  6. Adds the ability, when transferring images via FTP, to select protected images that failed to be transferred and protected images that have not yet been transferred and transfer them all at once.
  7. Adds [Save/load cam settings on card] to the Function settings tab of the menu.
    This allows you to save the camera settings to a card, or load a saved file and restore the camera to the settings you saved to a card.
  8. Fixes a phenomenon, in which, in rare instances, the camera does not function normally when using certain CFexpress cards.
  9. Fixes a phenomenon, in which in rare instances, the camera cannot function normally when the drive mode is set to “High-speed continuous shooting” to shoot still images continuously.
  10. Fixes a phenomenon in which the power may become suspended when the camera is powered via USB for an extended period of time.

Firmware Version 1.3.0 is for cameras with firmware up to Version 1.2.1. If the camera’s firmware is already Version 1.3.0, it is not necessary to update the firmware.

The following Applications have been updated accordingly:

  • Camera Connect 2.7.30
  • EOS Utility 3.13.20
  • Digital Photo Professional 4.14.0
  • Canon RAW Plugin 2.2 for Final Cut Pro X
  • Canon RAW Plugin 2.7 for Avid Media Access
    Please download the Applications as well as the latest firmware.

The EOS R5 receives a number of upgrades including Full HD 120p and support for greater customization of the camera. Another new addition is the ability to capture lower bit rate RAW movies to reduce the size of the RAW video files which makes file transfer faster. The update also adds Canon Log 3 which is goodo see. Canon have also now given you the ability to record lower bit rate IPB movies.

Users will now be able to save personalized and preferred camera settings to a memory card, which can be copied across to a different camera or used when settings are adjusted. There is also the option to turn the LCD monitor off during shooting and use it for playback only. The EOS R5 also gets full-time manual support for RF lenses, allowing photographers to override the focus of RF lenses manually when in Servo AF mode.

You can also now share photos with the new Protect Image Transfer function that allows protected images to be locked – preventing them from accidentally being deleted – and transferred via FTP.

EOS-1D X Mark III

Firmware Version 1.4.0 incorporates the following fixes and enhancements:

  1. Adds [RAW (Light)] to the movie recording size and [IPB (Light)] to 4K to enable lower bit rate shooting. These settings can also be selected when RAW+MP4 is set.
  2. The transfer time (estimated value) now displays on the camera monitor during FTP transfer.
  3. Improves communication reliability when using FTP and USB simultaneously.

Firmware Version 1.4.0 is for cameras with firmware up to Version 1.3.0. If the camera’s firmware is already Version 1.4.0, it is not necessary to update the firmware.

Just like with the EOS R5, the EOS-1D X Mark III gets the ability to record lower bit rate RAW video files. The EOS-1D X Mark III also gets Canon Log 3, the log gamma curve used by all Canon Cinema EOS cameras. The camera also receives the ability to capture lower bit rate IPB movies so you can create small, easily shareable video files.

EOS R6

Firmware Version 1.3.0 incorporates the following fixes and enhancements:

  1. Adds [IPB (Light)] to 4K to enable lower bit rate shooting.
  2. Adds [Electronic full-time MF] to the AF tab of the menu. When a lens is attached, manual focus adjustment is always possible with both One-shot AF and Servo AF.
  3. The transfer time (estimated value) now displays on the camera monitor during FTP transfer.
  4. Fixes a phenomenon, in which in rare instances, the camera cannot function normally when the drive mode is set to “High-speed continuous shooting” to shoot still images continuously.
  5. Fixes a phenomenon that may corrupt the image displayed in the viewfinder.
  6. Fixes a phenomenon in which the power may become suspended when the camera is powered via USB for an extended period of time.

Firmware Version 1.3.0 is for cameras with firmware up to Version 1.2.0. If the camera’s firmware is already Version 1.3.0, it is not necessary to update the firmware.

The R6 only receives IPB (Light) 4K, the option to turn the LCD monitor off during shooting and use for playback only, and the ability to now achieve full-time manual support for RF lenses, which allows users to override the focus of RF lenses manually when in Servo AF mode.

Apple M1 Support

Canon has also released several software updates today to complement the above firmware upgrades and bring support for Apple M1 processors via Rosetta for Digital Photo Professional (DPP) with v4.14 and EOS Utility with v3.13.20.

Canon will continue its commitment to photographers and videographers through further plans to bring new functionality to these three models based on user feedback.

The firmware and software updates are now available to download from the following links:
· EOS-1D X Mark III: https://www.canon.com.au/cameras/eos-1d-x-mark-iii/support?option=drivers
· EOS R5: https://www.canon.com.au/cameras/eos-r5/support?option=drivers
· EOS R6: https://www.canon.com.au/cameras/eos-r6/support?option=drivers

This post was originally published by New Shooter/Matthew Allard, ACS - March 29th, 2021
 

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) 1dx mark iii B&H Photo canon canon eos r5 canon mirrorless canon update eos r5 r6 Tempe Camera https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/3/canon-r5-r6-eos-1d-x-mark-iii-firmware-updates Wed, 31 Mar 2021 05:26:27 GMT
Canon Files Complaints with US ITC & U.S. District Courts https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/3/canon-files-toner-supply-complaints-with-usitc-and-in-u-s-district-courts Canon Ink CartridgesCanon Ink Cartridges

TOKYO, March 9, 2021—Canon today announced the filing of a complaint with the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) against 26 manufacturers, distributors and sellers of toner supply containers, asserting infringement of Canon's U.S. Patent Nos. 8,565,649; 9,354,551; 9,753,402; 10,209,667; 10,289,060; 10,289,061; 10,295,957; 10,488,814; 10,496,032; 10,496,033; 10,514,654; 10,520,881; and 10,520,882. The proposed respondents named in the ITC complaint are:

Ninestar Corporation
Ninestar Image Tech Limited
Ninestar Technology Company, Ltd.
Static Control Components, Inc.
General Plastic Industrial Co. Ltd.
Katun Corporation
Sichuan XingDian Technology Co., Ltd.
Sichuan Wiztoner Technology Co., Ltd.
Anhuiyatengshangmaoyouxiangongsi
ChengDuXiangChangNanShiYouSheBeiYouXianGongSi
Copier Repair Specialists, Inc.
Digital Marketing Corporation
Do It Wiser LLC
Easy Group, LLC
Hefeierlandianzishangwuyouxiangongsi
Ink Technologies Printer Supplies, LLC
Kuhlmann Enterprises, Inc.
LD Products, Inc.
NAR Cartridges
Shenzhenshi Keluodeng Kejiyouxiangognsi
Sun Data Supply, Inc.
The Supplies Guys, LLC
MITOCOLOR INC.
Xianshi yanliangqu canqiubaihuodianshanghang
Zhuhai Henyun Image Co., Ltd.
Zinyaw LLC

Canon also announced the filing of complaints against those companies in U.S. district courts across the country, asserting infringement of the above patents, including in the U.S. District Courts for the Central District of California, the Northern District of California, the District of Arizona, the District of Delaware, the District of Minnesota, the Eastern District of New York, the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, the Eastern District of Texas, the Southern District of Texas, the Middle District of North Carolina, and the Southern District of Ohio.

Throughout the development, sales and marketing process, Canon respects the intellectual property of other companies and individuals and expects others to similarly respect Canon's intellectual property rights. Canon remains committed to pursuing legal enforcement against those who do not respect Canon's intellectual property.

This post was originally published by Global Canon, Inc - March 9th, 2021

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) Canon Canon EOS R5 Canon Mirrorless Canon Update EOS EOS R5 R6 R6" US ITC https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/3/canon-files-toner-supply-complaints-with-usitc-and-in-u-s-district-courts Wed, 10 Mar 2021 05:45:00 GMT
Canon Cameras Possible in 2021 https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/1/canon-cameras-that-i-m-told-are-coming-in-2021 Canon RumorsCanon Rumors

The rumor mill has been quiet for a little while now, well until yesterday. A good source has laid out the camera body plans for Canon in 2021.

High-resolution RF body

This has been long rumored, we were talking about it even before the EOS R5 hit the scene. Canon will release an RF mount body with at least twice the megapixels of the EOS R5. I was told that the new sensor will “utilize new technologies for Canon”.

APS-C RF Body

This is another long-rumored camera, and news of it has picked up steam over the last couple of months. The source claims that the new APS-C RF mount camera will be “directly aimed at sports, wildlife and videography”.

A pair of New Entry-Level RF Full-Frame Bodies

I have been told that the plan from Canon was to release two cameras simultaneously to replace the EOS R and the EOS RP in the RF mount lineup

The first body would be the most affordable full-frame camera Canon has ever made, so it sounds like it’ll come in under what the EOS RP launched at.

The second camera will slot in between the EOS RP replacement and the EOS R6. While pricing is obviously not known yet, I could see these bodies priced at $899 and $1499 respectively.

The timeline for an announcement is unknown. The source did say that these cameras could be delayed due to continued manufacturing challenges in Japan.

The EOS R1 Flagship

The camera everyone is waiting for will show its face in 2021, whether or not you’ll be able to actually buy one this year is not known. I have been told by the same source that the “EOS R1” will be shown off ahead of the Tokyo Olympics this summer.

Canon Cinema EOS C50

Canon will likely announce the EOS C50 in the first half of 2021, it was apparently scheduled to be released in late 2020, but that obviously didn’t happen.

The rumors point to the EOS C50 being a box camera design.

Canon Cinema EOS C90

While I have reported on this body in the past, however, the source doesn’t have any knowledge about this camera.

The Canon 8K Cinema  EOS Camera

Canon recently teased a new 8K camera, so an announcement can be expected soon. There have been some rumors of two 8K cameras coming in 2021, but that hasn’t been confirmed.

Eight new cameras in a single calendar year does seem like a lot, especially with the current manufacturing issues hampering the industry. If I had to guess, a few of these cameras will fall into next year, but we could see announcements in 2021.

More to come…

This post was originally published by Canon Rumors - March 3, 2021
 

 

 


 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) 1DX 1DX MK II 5D MK IV B&H Photo Canon Canon EOS R5 Canon Mirrorless Canon's 4Q EOS R5 Tempe Camera https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2021/1/canon-cameras-that-i-m-told-are-coming-in-2021 Thu, 07 Jan 2021 05:15:00 GMT
Canon's 2020 Financial Results https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2020/12/canons-2020-financial-results Canon's 2020 financial results show drop in net sales, increase in profits for Imaging Systems business

Today, canon issued its financial report for its entire 2020 fiscal year (FY2020), which ran from January 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020. In it, Canon’s numbers and notes point towards a more positive path for its imaging division than it's seen in a number of years.

Since roughly 2012, the digital photography market has practically been in freefall, declining double-digit percentages year after year. 2020 isn’t any different, but even amidst the global COVID-19 pandemic, there is light at the end of the tunnel. Or, at the very least, the darkness is beginning to fade.

For reference, Canon’s Imaging System business includes its cameras, lenses, inkjet printers and other photo-related products. In this analysis, we’ll break down both the overall Imaging System business, as well as the camera-specific numbers, when available. All numbers are shown in Japanese Yen and American Dollars in parenthesis, with 'B' and 'M' representing billion and million, respectively.

Canon Financials 2020 Year EndCanon Financials 2020 Year EndScreenshot

For its FY2020, Canon’s Imaging System business reported net sales of ¥712.2B ($6.8B) and an operating profit of ¥71.8B ($690M), down 11.8% and up 49.1% year-over-year (YoY), respectively. Despite net sales being down 11.8%, both of these numbers are better than Canon’s FY2020 Q3 projections, which expected full-year net sales to be down 14.7% and operating profit to be up 5.9% YoY.

Looking at only camera sales for the Imaging Systems business, Canon reported net sales of ¥347.7B ($3.4B). This is higher than the ¥330.1B ($3.2B) Canon last projected but is still down 25.5% YoY. On a unit level, Canon sold 2.76 million digital interchangeable lens cameras. This is higher than the 2.7 million unit sales it last projected but is still 34% decrease YoY. Canon is already projecting next year will see a 1% increase in digital interchangeable lens camera sales. If the 1% increase holds true, it will be just the second time Canon has reported an increase in unit sales since 2013, with the other instance being a 2% increase back in 2016.

The dramatic increase in operating profit YoY (especially when taking into account the decrease in net sales) shows Canon managed to dramatically reduce expenses for its Imaging Systems business in 2020. Based on the supplementary data provided by Canon, it managed to reduce expenses for its Imaging Systems business by roughly ¥30B ($290M) in FY2020 compared to FY2019. Most of that decrease is attributed to a massive ¥21B ($200M) decrease in research and development costs in FY2020.

As it did in its FY2020 Q3 documents, Canon attributes this to a ‘faster-than-expected’ recovery in camera demand following the initial plummet in sales due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Evidence of this can be seen in the following chart, which shows (highlighted) that Canon’s camera net sales were down just 6.1% in Q4, compared to being down 16% in Q3 and down a whopping 54.5% in Q2, which the initial surge of the COVID-19 pandemic hit. Canon specifically notes its EOS R5 and EOS R6 mirrorless cameras are ‘resonating very well’ and attributing to the recovery of its Imaging Systems business.

Canon Financials 2020-4QCanon Financials 2020-4QScreenshot

While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to ravage much of the world, Canon notes the recent resurgence in cases — including the new strains of the novel coronavirus — doesn’t appear to have much of an impact on sales. Furthermore, Canon echoes the sentiments of Sigma CEO Kazuto Yamaki, who said in a recent interview he expects the photography market to stabilize in 2021. Canon says it expects the market contraction to be limited to just 3% YoY, which is a dramatic improvement compared to ~20% decreases seen over the past four years or so.

Looking forward to its 2021 fiscal year (FY2021), Canon is already projecting an increase in net camera sales of 4.8% and an increased operating profit (3.9%) for its entire Imaging Systems business.

Below are a few other tidbits from Canon’s full-year FY2020 presentation:

  • 35% of Canon’s camera unit sales are still digital compact cameras (1.48 million units)
  • Despite being 35% of unit sales, digital compact cameras account for only 13% of net sales by value (Canon includes lens sales in with the value of its interchangeable lens camera sales)
  • Canon is turning its Imaging Systems inventory around at a faster rate YoY (an average of 59 days in 2020 compared to an average of 66 days in 2019). This could be due to increased demand for printers since more people are working from home and Canon includes inkjet printers in its Imaging Systems business)

Overall, it appears as though Canon has weathered the storm and is keeping its head held high going into a year where many think the camera market will begin to stabilize after nearly a decade of decline. Canon says it plans to strengthen its EOS R system and improve its product mix for 2021. What that entails remains to be seen, but we’ll be here and ready to cover the news as new products and services are announced.

You can read through all of Canon’s FY2020 investor relations materials on the Canon Global website.

This post was originally published by DP Review/Gannon Burgett - January 29th, 2021
 

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) 1DX MK II 5D MK IV Canon Canon EOS R5 Canon Mirrorless Canon's 4Q EOS R5 https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2020/12/canons-2020-financial-results Fri, 01 Jan 2021 06:23:00 GMT
Canon EOS R5 Review https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2020/8/canon-eos-r5-review OUR VERDICT

As a stills camera, the Canon EOS R5 is simply Canon's finest product ever. It’s the perfect amalgamation of the EOS R’s form, the EOS 5D’s function, and the professional-grade autofocus of the EOS-1D X. If you're a stills or hybrid shooter who flits between photography and videography, it's one of the best cameras you will ever have the pleasure of using. Alas, we can’t recommend the R5 if your primary interest is pure video shooting. Don’t get us wrong, its video is incredible – but having to navigate the overheating restrictions prohibits it from being your A-camera (unless you only shoot 4K 30p, in which case you don’t need this anyway).

FOR

  • Pristine image quality
  • Best AF on the market
  • Best full-frame IBIS
  • 8K video is astounding
  • Lightning-fast burst

AGAINST

  • Recording limitations
  • Standard 4K is just okay

The Canon EOS R5 is finally here after months of waiting and masterful teases by the – there’s no other word for it – exceptionally canny manufacturer. 

No camera in recent memory has received or, dare we say it, deserved this amount of hype. The Canon EOS R5 is a powerhouse performer in every possible respect; its 8K video outclasses many of the best cinema cameras, its shooting speed puts it on par with the best cameras for sport, its 45MP sensor outmuscles all but a few of the best mirrorless cameras, and its 8-stop in-body image stabilization is the new IBIS champion. 

So, just how painful is this sting in the tail – and is there anything else on that remarkable spec sheet that has also proved too good to be true? With the R5 otherwise having all the ingredients to be the best Canon camera we’ve ever seen, let's see if it can possibly live up to the ridiculous hype…

SPECIFICATIONS

Sensor: 45MP full-frame CMOS 36 x 24mm
Image processor: Digic X
AF points: 5,940 Dual Pixel CMOS AF II
ISO range: 100-51,200 (expandable to 50-102,400)
Stabilization: 5-axis, up to 8 stops
Max image size: 8,192 x 5,464px
Metering zones: 384
Video: 8K DCI or UHD at 30p, 24p / 4K DCI or UHD at 120p, 100p, 60p, 50p, 30p, 25p, 24p / 1080p (FullHD) at 60p, 50p, 30p, 25p, 24p
Viewfinder: 0.5-inch OLED EVF, 5,690k dots, 100% coverage, 0.76x magnification, 120fps refresh rate
Memory card: 1x CFexpress type B, 1x UHS-II SD/SDHC/SDXC
LCD: 3.15-inch fully articulating touchscreen, 2,100k dots.
Max burst: 12fps mechanical shutter, 20fps electronic shutter
Connectivity: Wi-Fi 5Ghz and 2.4GHz, Bluetooth 4.2, USB-C (USB 3.1 Gen 2), micro HDMI (type D), microphone, headphone, N3 remote, flash sync, gigabit ethernet (via WFT-R10 grip)
Size: 135.8 x 97.5 x 88mm
Weight: 650g body only (738g with card and battery)

Such are the lofty specs of the Canon EOS R5 that virtually every feature is a key feature. Obviously the headline attraction here is the remarkable video capability. The R5 can capture full-width (uncropped) raw 8K video using the entire readout of the 35mm sensor – and it does so internally at up to 29.97fps in 4:2:2 12-bit Canon Log or HDR PQ (both H.265) in both UHD and DCI. 

Its 4K capture is every bit as ferocious, recording at up to 119.88fps (in the same 4:2:2 Canon Log or HDR PQ, in UHD or DCI) with external HDMI recording up at up to 59.94fps.  However, the R5 is much more than just a video behemoth

Since the 8K DCI video has a resolution of 8,192 x 4,320, the camera has a Frame Grab function that enables you to take high-resolution 35.4MP stills (as JPEGs) from your footage – which is 5.1MP greater resolution than the Canon EOS R

All of this is thanks to the brand new 45MP image sensor, which Canon claims makes the R5 “the highest resolution EOS camera ever” – supposedly resolving even greater detail than the 50.6MP Canon EOS 5DS / R. This is thanks to the new low-pass filter design, which was introduced in the flagship Canon EOS-1D X Mark III

Traditional low-pass filters (employed to get rid of moiré) employ dual-layer, four-point subsampling and introduce a layer of softness to images. Canon’s new tech features quad-layer, 16-point subsampling and combines it with a Gaussian distribution technique to deliver sharpness rivaling the 5DS / R. (Our lab results for the 1D X Mark III didn’t quite bear this out, and we’re currently testing the R5 to see if it comes true this time). 

Canon R5-1Canon R5-1

The flagship 1D X has served as donor for much of the tech in the EOS R5. The AI-powered Deep Learning AF system has been transplanted, enabling the new camera to perform spookily accurate eye, face and head tracking. However, the R5 has a trick that even the Mark III doesn’t have; it is also capable of Animal AF that can track the eyes, faces and bodies of dogs, cats and birds – including birds in flight. 

Underpinning the autofocus is the brand new Dual Pixel CMOS AF II – the latest generation of Canon’s much-lauded AF system. And best of all, all these autofocus technologies are available in stills as well as all video resolutions and frame-rates – with a staggering 5,940 AF points for photography and 4,500 for filming.

And the continuous shooting speed is also on par with the 1D X Mark III, as the R5 matches the flagship’s top speed of 20fps via the electronic shutter (and 12fps using the mechanical shutter). Backed up by dual card slots, including lightning-fast CFexpress support, this means that the R5 can stand toe-to-toe with sports cameras, video cameras and medium format cameras alike. 

Most excitingly, for long-suffering Canon users, the EOS R5 features the company’s agonizingly overdue implementation of 5-axis in-body stabilization. The wait, however, has been worth it, as Canon is now officially the king of IBIS – the R5 (and the Canon EOS R6) boasts up to 8 stops of CIPA-rated stabilization, depending on the lens. 

While you get the top stability when using specific RF-mount glass, the IBIS also works with EF lenses, EF-S lenses, as well as ‘dumb’ lenses with no electrical contacts – that means vintage lenses, cinema lenses, lenses adapted from other camera systems… essentially any lens.

BUILD AND HANDLING

In the hand, the EOS R5 feels like a slightly beefier EOS R. It’s almost imperceptibly thicker (literally just 3.6mm), but it has notably more heft, weighing about 70g more. The weight is very evenly distributed, though, and the body feels very well balanced – indeed, the extra mass makes it feel a better match for some of the notoriously larger RF lenses. 

From the top, the R5 is very similar to the EOS R and bears the same top OLED screen and mode button within the rear control dial. It’s the rear where the differences start to come into play, and the first thing you’ll notice is that the love-it-or-loathe it M-Fn touchbar has been abolished; in its place is a familiar joystick, with the AF-ON button assuming its more traditional position. 

A control wheel has also replaced the individual D-pad buttons seen on the EOS R and Canon EOS RP, all of which makes the R5 feel much more like using a Canon EOS 5D Mark IV – fitting, as this is a 5-series camera intended to sit alongside its DSLR counterpart.

Thankfully the camera retains the fully articulating touchscreen seen on the EOS R and RP, which is obviously important for recording video (as well as taking stills from elevated or low angles). 

Being a 5-series camera, you can expect the same robust weather sealing – though invariably, given that the mirrorless model is daintier (and also features an articulating screen), it doesn’t feel as sturdy as the 5D. For sure it will withstand some knocks, but unlike the DSLR you really wouldn’t want to drop it or leave it in the hands of children.

The R5 also features a brand new 2,130mAh battery, the LP-E6NH, which features 14% greater capacity than the LP-E6N that it replaces – and it’s backwards-compatible with any camera that accepts the LP-E6 family of batteries, so you can use it with your other cameras as well. 

Canon R5-2Canon R5-2

BUILD AND HANDLING

In the hand, the EOS R5 feels like a slightly beefier EOS R. It’s almost imperceptibly thicker (literally just 3.6mm), but it has notably more heft, weighing about 70g more. The weight is very evenly distributed, though, and the body feels very well balanced – indeed, the extra mass makes it feel a better match for some of the notoriously larger RF lenses. 

From the top, the R5 is very similar to the EOS R and bears the same top OLED screen and mode button within the rear control dial. It’s the rear where the differences start to come into play, and the first thing you’ll notice is that the love-it-or-loathe it M-Fn touchbar has been abolished; in its place is a familiar joystick, with the AF-ON button assuming its more traditional position. 

A control wheel has also replaced the individual D-pad buttons seen on the EOS R and Canon EOS RP, all of which makes the R5 feel much more like using a Canon EOS 5D Mark IV – fitting, as this is a 5-series camera intended to sit alongside its DSLR counterpart.

Thankfully the camera retains the fully articulating touchscreen seen on the EOS R and RP, which is obviously important for recording video (as well as taking stills from elevated or low angles). 

Being a 5-series camera, you can expect the same robust weather sealing – though invariably, given that the mirrorless model is daintier (and also features an articulating screen), it doesn’t feel as sturdy as the 5D. For sure it will withstand some knocks, but unlike the DSLR you really wouldn’t want to drop it or leave it in the hands of children.

The R5 also features a brand new 2,130mAh battery, the LP-E6NH, which features 14% greater capacity than the LP-E6N that it replaces – and it’s backwards-compatible with any camera that accepts the LP-E6 family of batteries, so you can use it with your other cameras as well. 

If you don't fall foul of the recording limitations, though, you will behold 8K video that is astoundingly rich and detailed (and of course, 20 minutes of 8K is still 20 minutes more than any other camera right now), while the oversampled 4K modes produce some of the best footage we've ever seen. The standard line-skipped 4K feels a bit pedestrian, however, and the Canon EOS R6 is actually superior in this regard as it doesn't feature line-skipping.

As you can see in the sample 4K videos above (at 60fps) and below (at 120fps), the quality is crystal clear and the powerful IBIS truly enables you to shoot gimbal-free in most situations. Just bear in mind that if you're going to be filming 8K, oversampled 4K or 4K 120p, you will need to invest in one of the best external hard drives because you will fill up memory cards and disc space fast. You'll also need a very beefy computer to actually process 8K, as some won't even open the videos – let alone handle editing and grading the footage. 

There are other video restrictions worth being mindful of – you can't record the more demanding video modes (RAW, 8K 4K 120p and so on) unless you're using a CFexpress card, so bear that in mind if you're using SD. 

Accordingly, you can't record your video to both cards, to create a redundant backup, so you will need to get comfortable working with proxies – and with the idea that should you have a card failure, you will lose your work. And of course, you can't record 8K or 4K footage using EF-S lenses, as this crops the recording area, or with movie cropping enabled (which obviously does the same). 

If you don't fall foul of the recording limitations, though, you will behold 8K video that is astoundingly rich and detailed (and of course, 20 minutes of 8K is still 20 minutes more than any other camera right now), while the oversampled 4K modes produce some of the best footage we've ever seen. The standard line-skipped 4K feels a bit pedestrian, however, and the Canon EOS R6 is actually superior in this regard as it doesn't feature line-skipping.

As you can see in the sample 4K videos above (at 60fps) and below (at 120fps), the quality is crystal clear and the powerful IBIS truly enables you to shoot gimbal-free in most situations. Just bear in mind that if you're going to be filming 8K, oversampled 4K or 4K 120p, you will need to invest in one of the best external hard drives because you will fill up memory cards and disc space fast. You'll also need a very beefy computer to actually process 8K, as some won't even open the videos – let alone handle editing and grading the footage. 

There are other video restrictions worth being mindful of – you can't record the more demanding video modes (RAW, 8K 4K 120p and so on) unless you're using a CFexpress card, so bear that in mind if you're using SD. 

Accordingly, you can't record your video to both cards, to create a redundant backup, so you will need to get comfortable working with proxies – and with the idea that should you have a card failure, you will lose your work. And of course, you can't record 8K or 4K footage using EF-S lenses, as this crops the recording area, or with movie cropping enabled (which obviously does the same). 

Canon R5-3Canon R5-3

No need to move any focus points, no need to touch the joystick at all; just set the camera to ‘Subject: Animals’, stick it in C-AF and hold it towards an animal. Canon only certifies it for dogs, cats and birds, but we successfully tested it on lions, monkeys, turtles, iguanas, fish, skunks, meerkats, raccoons, sand squirrels, Fennec foxes… if it’s got eyes and a face, the R5 will almost certainly recognize it.

No exaggeration, this is genuinely game-changing technology that is probably going to put a lot of wildlife photographers out of business. Because you could put this camera in the hands of your children, and they would come home from the zoo with a whole load of in-focus pictures of animals. It’s that easy and that good. 

And obviously the AF is even better when it comes to shooting human subjects, with a witchcraft-like ability to find and focus on faces and eyes in an instant – even when features are obscured or your tracking gets interrupted by hands, objects or passers-by. You can safely tell your Sony-owning friends that, yes, Canon now has the best autofocus in town – it really is black magic.

Best of all, these autofocus functions are all 100% available and effective when shooting video as well. So whether you’re filming videos of the bride and groom at a wedding, or footage of wild animals chasing each other across the Serengeti, the Canon EOS R5 will find your subjects and focus on them. The AF is spookily good – it’s just a shame that the R5 is haunted by the specter of its video.

Worth mentioning is the latest implementation of Canon's Dual Pixel RAW tech. This feature, which makes use of both photodiodes on a single pixel, was previously seen on the 5D Mark IV to ever-so-slightly change the focus in your images. While that was mostly unconvincing, here the technology is much more mature – and actually could be incredibly useful. 

On the R5 you can change the clarity of your backgrounds (as if adjusting the same slider in Photoshop), but more impressively you can add a lighting source and modifier to change the lighting of your images in camera. So, if you have an underexposed face and you want to add a key light with barn doors to selectively brighten it, you can do it without Photoshop – and it works pretty well, especially using the touchscreen. 

LAB DATA

We tested the Canon EOS R5 alongside the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV, as the R5 could well be the indirect replacement for the DSLR. The Nikon Z7 and Sony A7R IV are obvious mirrorless rivals to the EOS R5, at least for stills shooting.

Resolution: 

Canon R5 Review-3Canon R5 Review-3

Our resolution test results mostly reflect what you'd expect from the varying megapixel counts offered by each camera. Unsurprisingly, the 61MP Sony A7R IV comes out on top and is the camera of choice for resolving the finest details. With 45.7 megapixels on tap, the Nikon Z7 comes in second to the Sony, yet it manages to score significantly higher than the 45MP EOS R5 – something we weren't expecting, given the two cameras have almost identical megapixel counts. 

The reason for this discrepancy seems to be the Nikon's slightly better resistance to moiré interference, which is more prominent in the EOS R5's resolution chart images, and it affects our scoring. The EOS R5's real-world images are comparably sharp to those from the Z7. Predictably, with only 30.4MP, the 5D Mark IV can't quite compete with its mirrorless counterparts for fine detail capture.

Dynamic range:

Canon R5 Review-4Canon R5 Review-4

At lower sensitivities, up to ISO1600, the EOS R5 is capable of capturing similarly high dynamic range to its 5D IV DSLR sibling and the Nikon Z7. However, at higher sensitivities the new Canon can't quite stay at the top of the pile, with the 5D IV and Z7 capable of up to 2 stops more dynamic range than the R5. It's worth noting that any in-camera dynamic range enhancement is disabled for our lab testing, in order to get a level playing field.

Signal to noise ratio:

Canon R5 Review-5Canon R5 Review-5

Our signal to noise test measures image clarity, specifically the ratio of the actual image 'data' you want to capture, versus the image noise that you don't want, but will inevitably be visible when shooting at higher ISO sensitivities. The higher the score at a given ISO sensitivity, the better.

Here the EOS R5 scores well, level-pegging with the Z7 and A7R IV throughout most of the tested sensitivity range. However, the good old 5D Mark IV generates cleaner images than the newer mirrorless cameras at ISO200 and above. This isn't all that surprising, as the DSLR's lower megapixel count is spread over the same full-frame sensor area, meaning that it has larger individual photosites that can be more light-sensitive and therefore generate less image noise.

Canon R5-6Canon R5-6

VERDICT

The Canon EOS R5 is a real Jekyll and Hyde product. For photography, it is absolutely the camera to beat. Though the A7R IV is has more megapixels, and while we're surprised that the 5D Mark IV has superior ISO and dynamic range, the gestalt properties of the R5 – the resolution, frame-rates, IBIS, autofocus – make this hands-down the king of all-round, high resolution, high speed photography. 

The autofocus really can't be overstated. If you take pictures of people or animals, you will automatically benefit from the advantages that the R5 delivers. We'd go so far as to say that not only is it the best camera for wildlife photography, but that any serious wildlife shooter should really think about adopting it.

The image stabilization in the EOS R5 is the finest we've used on any full-frame system, and is only bested by Micro Four Thirds cameras from Olympus and Panasonic (which feature superior IBIS because their sensors are so much smaller). It makes such a difference whether you're shooting in low light, with long shutter speeds, on long lenses or filming video without a gimbal.

 

Alas, video is the Mr Hyde of the equation. The reality is that we can’t recommend the Canon EOS R5 if your primary interest is pure video shooting. Don’t get us wrong, its video is incredible – but having to navigate the overheating restrictions prohibits this from being an A camera (unless you only shoot 4K 30p, in which case you don’t need this anyway). 

It's perfectly possible to never once run into the recording limitations if you only film videos that are a few minutes long, which for many people will actually be fine. And in short bursts, its top-tier 4K and 8K modes are truly stunning – but the more video you shoot, the less usable it becomes, making it hard to recommend for video-first use when there are other cameras that shoot above 4K 30p with no limits. Sadly, it's not the magic camera that content creators and cinematographers hoped for.

However, as a stills camera, the R5 is simply Canon's finest product ever. It’s the perfect amalgamation of the EOS R’s form, the EOS 5D’s function, and the professional-grade autofocus of the EOS-1D X. If you're a stills or hybrid shooter who flits between photography and videography, the Canon EOS R5 is a remarkable piece of technology and one of the best cameras you will ever have the pleasure of using. 

This post was originally published by DP Review/ - 

 

 

 

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) Canon Canon EOS R5 Canon Mirrorless Canon Update EOS R5 EOS R6 R6 https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2020/8/canon-eos-r5-review Fri, 07 Aug 2020 05:15:00 GMT
Canon 1DX Mark III Firmware Update https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2020/4/canon-releases-1d-x-mark-iii-firmware-update As it had promised a few weeks back, Canon has released a firmware update (version 1.1.0) for its 1D X Mark III DSLR camera that addresses the lock-up issue we first reported on in early March. In addition to the lock-up issue, the update addresses a few other ‘enhancements and fixes.’

First and foremost, firmware version 1.1.0 corrects a problem that would cause the camera to lock up when the electronic level is set to ‘Show’ in the viewfinder display and the shutter or AF-ON button is pressed.

Canon 1DX UpdateCanon 1DX Update

The update, which was released on March 31 and only recently brought to our attention, also fixes an issue where the ‘Custom Shooting Mode’ settings could change when the shooting mode is switched and adds the option for a 23.98p frame rate option. Canon has also improved the communication speed when connected via wired LAN, added a ‘Browser Remote’ function and added the ability to transfer only images that are protected.

You can find the firmware update, available to download on both macOS and Windows computers, on Canon Europe’s 1D X Mark III support page.

 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) 1DX 1DX MK II Canon Canon Mirrorless Canon Update EOS R5 R6 R6" https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2020/4/canon-releases-1d-x-mark-iii-firmware-update Sat, 11 Apr 2020 06:13:09 GMT
Canon Temporarily Shutting Down From COVID-19 https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2020/3/canon-is-temporarily-shutting-down-five-of-its-factories-caused-by-covid-19 Canon has announced it will be suspending operations at five of its plants on Japan’s Kyushu island due to supply shortages from China caused by COVID-19 (Coronavirus).

Canon FactoryCanon Factory

The five factories, located in the Oita, Miyazaki and Nagasaki prefectures, produce cameras and other photographic gear. The manufacturing facilities will shut down from March 2 to March 13, with Nikkei (translated) reporting these missed production days will be made up at a later time in the year when the supply of parts is more stable.

DPReview has contacted Canon for more details on what products these closures will affect. We will update this article accordingly if we receive a response.

This post was originally published by DP Review/ Gannon Burgett - Mar 2, 2020
 

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) Coronavirus https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2020/3/canon-is-temporarily-shutting-down-five-of-its-factories-caused-by-covid-19 Tue, 03 Mar 2020 07:14:54 GMT
Canon Announces Development of EOS R5 Mirrorless https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2020/2/canon-announces-development-of-eos-r5-with-ibis-8k-video-and-20fps-shooting

Canon has announced the development of the R5 - a flagship RF-mount mirrorless camera with built-in image stabilization, capable of 8K video and 20fps stills shooting. Beyond that, details are scant, but the new camera is expected to be released at some point this year.

Key specifications (so far):

  • Newly designed CMOS sensor (likely 40MP)
  • In-camera image stabilization
  • 20fps continuous shooting (silent shutter)
  • 12ps continuous shooting (mechanical shutter)
  • 8K video capture
  • Twin card slots

Rumors have been swirling about an upcoming R-series camera for a while, and while Canon had already confirmed that IBIS was coming to the R lineup, we were skeptical about the '8K video' claim at first. This was for a few reasons, but principally the fact that the average consumer won't be able to view the footage at full resolution. However, it seems that the R5 will, indeed, offer some kind of 8K video capture option.

Canon's press release is rather non-specific when it comes to details, referring to the ability of photographers 'to extract high-resolution still images from video footage as well as process 8K video into higher-quality 4K video'. As such, it's possible that for practical purposes, the R5's main selling point will be 2X oversampled 4K, but we'll find out soon enough. The formidable amount of data generated by true 8K video capture (not to mention heat) would seem to present major technological challenges, but it's too early to say how (or if) Canon has dealt with them.

Ergonomically, the R5 appears to be a clear evolution of the original EOS R with more overt continuity with Canon's existing DSLR controls

To natively sample 8K video (usually defined as 7680 x 4320 pixels) would require a 7680 x 5120 pixel sensor. This being the case, if the 8K isn't cropped, we can make a pretty good guess that effective resolution of the R5 will be ~40MP. Beyond these very limited headline specs, all we know about the R5 is what we can glean from the limited views of the camera released by Canon. Ergonomically, the R5 appears to be a clear evolution of the original EOS R, with more DSLR-like ergonomics (and no M-Fn bar!) but we'll bring you more information when we have it.

Alongside the R5, Canon is also teasing '9 RF lenses' coming later this year, including a new telezoom - the RF 100-500mm F4.5-7.1 L IS USM. Samples of the R5, the 100-500mm, and two new RF Extenders (1.4X and 2X) are expected to be shown at the WPPI show in Las Vegas, and the CP+ show in Yokohama, Japan, both scheduled to take place later this month.

Press release:

The Next Generation: Canon Announces The Development Of The Company’s Most Advanced Full-Frame Mirrorless Camera Ever – The EOS R5

The Company will Also Develop Seven RF Lenses and Two RF Lens Extenders in 2020

MELVILLE, NY, February 12, 2020 – Canon U.S.A. Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced that its parent company, Canon Inc., is developing the highly anticipated Canon EOS R5 full-frame mirrorless camera. The camera will feature a newly designed CMOS sensor and new image processor, along with new state-of-the-art optical technologies the company has been able to cultivate through its long history of groundbreaking camera and digital imaging solutions development. In addition, Canon plans to release seven RF lenses and two RF lens extenders that are currently in development. These new photography tools will help to continue to strengthen the EOS R system and cement the RF mount as an industry leader.

“Today’s announcement comes as a direct result of the tireless effort of Canon engineers who have been tasked with developing the next generation of Canon EOS R camera and RF lenses to help elevate the popular system that was announced in 2018,” said Kazuto Ogawa, president and chief operating officer, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “In developing the new camera, Canon listened to extensive user-feedback from a variety of photographers. The outcome is a camera and lenses that will delight a variety of shooters and further helps to demonstrate Canon’s commitment to full-frame mirrorless cameras and lenses.”

The EOS R System was initially developed to provide engineers with the ability to design lenses that were thought to be impossible to create previously. The wide lens mount diameter, shorter back focus, and high-speed system for transmitting data between camera and lens have resulted in an imaging system that delivers higher image quality and greater ease-of-use than ever before.

The new full-frame mirrorless camera currently under development will fully leverage the advantages of the EOS R System, helping to produce a camera that features high-speed continuous shooting and 8K video recording. Furthermore, the camera will provide photographers with more efficient workflows thanks to improved transmission functionality, operability and reliability. These enhancements, along with many others, will help to further elevate and solidify the EOS Series concept of “Speed, Comfort and High-Image-Quality.”

Canon’s EOS R5, the first of the next generation of full-frame mirrorless cameras planned for EOS R System, will include a newly developed CMOS sensor. The new sensor will enable enhanced features such as high-speed continuous shooting up to approximately 20 frames-per-second (FPS) when using the silent shutter and up to approximately 12 FPS when using the mechanical shutter – A feature professional sports and wildlife photographers will find to be extremely impactful on their ability to capture fast-moving subjects. From a video perspective, the camera’s 8K video capture capability will prepare videographers for the future of movie-making- capturing 8K footage today allows for even higher-quality 4K productions in addition to the ability to extract high-resolution still images from the video footage. The EOS R5 will be the first Canon camera equipped with IBIS (In Body Image Stabilization) and when used in conjunction with the extremely effective in-lens stabilization (IS), will allow photographers to handhold the camera in light levels not previously imagined. Additionally, the camera will also feature dual-card slots and will support the automatic transfer of image files from the device to the new image. canon cloud platform.

Alongside the EOS R5, Canon is also developing seven RF lenses and two RF lens extenders scheduled for release during 2020, including the RF 100-500mm F4.5-7.1 L IS USM, Extender RF 1.4x and Extender RF 2x.

Additional Information

Reference exhibits for the EOS R5 and RF 100-500mm F4.5-7.1 L IS USM, Extender RF 1.4x and Extender RF 2x will be on display in the Canon booth at the CP+ Camera and Photo Imaging Show 2020, to be held from February 27 to March 1 at the Pacifico Yokohama convention hall in Yokohama, Japan.

A preview of the EOS R5 will be on display at the 2020 WPPI Show (February 25-27) in Las Vegas.

]]>
info@mcentofanti.photography (M Centofanti Photography) Canon EOS R5 https://www.mcentofanti.photography/blog/2020/2/canon-announces-development-of-eos-r5-with-ibis-8k-video-and-20fps-shooting Mon, 24 Feb 2020 05:49:27 GMT